The role of alcohol use and depression in intimate partner violence among black and Hispanic patients in an urban emergency department

Sherry Lipsky, Raul Caetano, Craig A. Field, Shahrzad Bazargan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to assess the role of alcohol use and depression in intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and perpetration among Blacks and Hispanics in an underserved urban emergency department population. Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed male and female patients presenting to an urban emergency department. The outcome measures were physical or sexual IPV victimization and perpetration in the previous 12 months. The independent predictors included demographic variables, alcohol and drug use, and depressive symptoms. Logistic regression analyses calculated the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for predictors of IPV victimization and perpetration in separate models. Results: The prevalence of IPV victimization among Blacks and Hispanics were similar (14% and 10%, respectively) but blacks were nearly twice as likely to report IPV perpetration (17% vs. 9%, respectively). Predictors of IPV perpetration were Black race, married or living with a partner, heavy drinking, illicit drug use, and current depression. Depression, but not substance use, also predicted IPV victimization, in addition to Black race, married or living with a partner, and younger age. Conclusions: Screening for substance abuse and depression in an inner city emergency department population may help to identify individuals at high risk of IPV, particularly IPV perpetration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-242
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Hospital Emergency Service
Alcohols
Depression
Crime Victims
Intimate Partner Violence
Sexual Partners
Street Drugs
Population
Drinking
Substance-Related Disorders
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Alcohol drinking
  • Depression
  • Domestic violence
  • Emergency medicine
  • Ethnicity
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The role of alcohol use and depression in intimate partner violence among black and Hispanic patients in an urban emergency department. / Lipsky, Sherry; Caetano, Raul; Field, Craig A.; Bazargan, Shahrzad.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2005, p. 225-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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