The role of contact lenses, trauma, and Langerhans cells in a Chinese hamster model of Acanthamoeba keratitis

F. Van Klink, H. Alizadeh, Y. He, J. A. Mellon, R. E. Silvany, J. P. McCulley, J. Y. Niederkorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To determine the role of contact lenses, corneal trauma, and Langerhans cells in the development of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba organisms in Chinese hamsters. Methods. Various methods were used to induce corneal infections in Chinese hamsters, including application of parasite- laden contact lenses. The role of corneal epithelial defects in promoting parasite binding was examined in vitro in a microscopic binding assay. The role of corneal abrasion in the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis was also examined in Chinese hamsters exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. Other experiments evaluated the effect of infiltrating Langerhans cells on the incidence and severity of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Results. Corneal epithelial defects promoted extensive parasite binding to abraded corneas compared to intact, nonabraded counterparts. Corneal abrasion was absolutely necessary for the induction of Acanthamoeba keratitis in hamsters infected with contaminated contact lenses. Infection was never detected unless the corneas were abraded before exposure to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas prevented the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Conclusions. The highest incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurs in corneas expressing epithelial defects and exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses prevents the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1937-1944
Number of pages8
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume34
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Acanthamoeba Keratitis
Langerhans Cells
Contact Lenses
Cricetulus
Parasites
Cornea
Wounds and Injuries
Incidence
Infection
Cricetinae

Keywords

  • Acanthamoeba sp
  • contact lens
  • cornea
  • hamster
  • Langerhans' cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

The role of contact lenses, trauma, and Langerhans cells in a Chinese hamster model of Acanthamoeba keratitis. / Van Klink, F.; Alizadeh, H.; He, Y.; Mellon, J. A.; Silvany, R. E.; McCulley, J. P.; Niederkorn, J. Y.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 34, No. 6, 1993, p. 1937-1944.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{030c26fb18de4447a16dcf1ae98550b3,
title = "The role of contact lenses, trauma, and Langerhans cells in a Chinese hamster model of Acanthamoeba keratitis",
abstract = "Purpose. To determine the role of contact lenses, corneal trauma, and Langerhans cells in the development of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba organisms in Chinese hamsters. Methods. Various methods were used to induce corneal infections in Chinese hamsters, including application of parasite- laden contact lenses. The role of corneal epithelial defects in promoting parasite binding was examined in vitro in a microscopic binding assay. The role of corneal abrasion in the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis was also examined in Chinese hamsters exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. Other experiments evaluated the effect of infiltrating Langerhans cells on the incidence and severity of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Results. Corneal epithelial defects promoted extensive parasite binding to abraded corneas compared to intact, nonabraded counterparts. Corneal abrasion was absolutely necessary for the induction of Acanthamoeba keratitis in hamsters infected with contaminated contact lenses. Infection was never detected unless the corneas were abraded before exposure to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas prevented the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Conclusions. The highest incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurs in corneas expressing epithelial defects and exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses prevents the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis.",
keywords = "Acanthamoeba sp, contact lens, cornea, hamster, Langerhans' cells",
author = "{Van Klink}, F. and H. Alizadeh and Y. He and Mellon, {J. A.} and Silvany, {R. E.} and McCulley, {J. P.} and Niederkorn, {J. Y.}",
year = "1993",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "1937--1944",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "0146-0404",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of contact lenses, trauma, and Langerhans cells in a Chinese hamster model of Acanthamoeba keratitis

AU - Van Klink, F.

AU - Alizadeh, H.

AU - He, Y.

AU - Mellon, J. A.

AU - Silvany, R. E.

AU - McCulley, J. P.

AU - Niederkorn, J. Y.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Purpose. To determine the role of contact lenses, corneal trauma, and Langerhans cells in the development of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba organisms in Chinese hamsters. Methods. Various methods were used to induce corneal infections in Chinese hamsters, including application of parasite- laden contact lenses. The role of corneal epithelial defects in promoting parasite binding was examined in vitro in a microscopic binding assay. The role of corneal abrasion in the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis was also examined in Chinese hamsters exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. Other experiments evaluated the effect of infiltrating Langerhans cells on the incidence and severity of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Results. Corneal epithelial defects promoted extensive parasite binding to abraded corneas compared to intact, nonabraded counterparts. Corneal abrasion was absolutely necessary for the induction of Acanthamoeba keratitis in hamsters infected with contaminated contact lenses. Infection was never detected unless the corneas were abraded before exposure to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas prevented the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Conclusions. The highest incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurs in corneas expressing epithelial defects and exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses prevents the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

AB - Purpose. To determine the role of contact lenses, corneal trauma, and Langerhans cells in the development of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba organisms in Chinese hamsters. Methods. Various methods were used to induce corneal infections in Chinese hamsters, including application of parasite- laden contact lenses. The role of corneal epithelial defects in promoting parasite binding was examined in vitro in a microscopic binding assay. The role of corneal abrasion in the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis was also examined in Chinese hamsters exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. Other experiments evaluated the effect of infiltrating Langerhans cells on the incidence and severity of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Results. Corneal epithelial defects promoted extensive parasite binding to abraded corneas compared to intact, nonabraded counterparts. Corneal abrasion was absolutely necessary for the induction of Acanthamoeba keratitis in hamsters infected with contaminated contact lenses. Infection was never detected unless the corneas were abraded before exposure to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas prevented the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Conclusions. The highest incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurs in corneas expressing epithelial defects and exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses. The presence of Langerhans cells in corneas exposed to parasite-laden contact lenses prevents the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

KW - Acanthamoeba sp

KW - contact lens

KW - cornea

KW - hamster

KW - Langerhans' cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027287326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027287326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 1937

EP - 1944

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 6

ER -