The role of prehospital electrocardiograms in the recognition of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions and reperfusion times

Yaniv Kerem, Joshua S. Eastvold, Deann Faragoi, Diana Strasburger, Sean E. Motzny, Erik B. Kulstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Clinical outcomes in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are related to reperfusion times. Given the benefit of early recognition of STEMI and resulting ability to decrease reperfusion times and improve mortality, current prehospital recommendations are to obtain electrocardiograms (ECGs) in patients with concern for acute coronary syndrome. Objectives We sought to determine the effect of wireless transmission of prehospital ECGs on STEMI recognition and reperfusion times. We hypothesized decreased reperfusion times in patients in whom prehospital ECGs were obtained. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of patients who presented to our suburban, tertiary care, teaching hospital emergency department with STEMI on a prehospital ECG. Results Ninety-nine patients underwent reperfusion therapy. Patients with prehospital ECGs had a mean time to angioplasty suite of 43 min (95% confidence interval [CI] 31-54). Compared to patients with no prehospital ECG, mean time to angioplasty suite was 49 min (95% CI 41-57), p = 0.035. Patients with prehospital STEMI identification and catheterization laboratory activation had a mean time to angioplasty suite of 33 min (95% CI 25-41), p = 0.007. Patients with prehospital ECGs had a mean door-to-balloon time of 66 min (95% CI 53-79), whereas the control group had a mean door-to-balloon time of 79 min (95% CI 67-90), p = 0.024. Patients with prehospital STEMI identification and catheterization laboratory activation had a mean door-to-balloon time of 58 min (95% CI 48-68), p = 0.018. Conclusions Prehospital STEMI identification allows for prompt catheterization laboratory activation, leading to decreased reperfusion times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-207
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Keywords

  • acute coronary syndrome
  • ECG
  • prehospital
  • reperfusion
  • STEMI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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