The role of the immune system in glaucoma: Bridging the divide between immune mechanisms in experimental glaucoma and the human disease

Shivani S. Kamat, Meredith S. Gregory, Louis R. Pasquale

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. Classically, clinicians have evaluated patients through a full ophthalmological examination including gonioscopy, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP), and assessment of the optic nerve. New imaging modalities have further enhanced our ability to evaluate glaucoma; however, our treatments have not evolved as much. Whether one uses medical treatment with topical ocular antihypertensives, laser trabeculoplasty, or filtering surgery, the mainstay of treatment is to lower IOP. However, as our understanding of the disease evolves, mechanisms other than elevated IOP have been implicated in glaucoma pathogenesis. Recent animal model studies have shown a possible role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. This article explores the current understanding of immune reactions in glaucoma, which could lead to a new paradigm of treatment for human disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Ophthalmology
Volume31
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptive immunity
  • Glaucoma
  • Innate immunity
  • TNF alpha

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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