The Supported vs Unsupported Ross in Pediatric Patients: Neoaortic Root and Ventricular Function

Mami Sow, Salil Ginde, Peter Bartz, Scott Cohen, Jennifer Gerardin, Evelyn Kuhn, Robert Jaquiss, S. Bert Litwin, Ronald K. Woods, Viktor Hraska, James S. Tweddell, Michael E. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The supported Ross is used to mitigate the neoaortic root dilation that has been described with the unsupported Ross. There is limited literature assessing the efficacy of the supported Ross in young patients. In this study, the fate of the neoaortic root was compared in the supported and unsupported Ross procedure in adolescent patients. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent the Ross procedure between 1996 and 2019. An analysis was conducted of patients aged 10 to 18 years who underwent the supported and unsupported Ross operation, without a Konno enlargement, to assess for longitudinal echocardiographic changes. Given differences in follow-up time, both regression analysis and Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests were used to correct for time from discharge to most recent follow-up. Results: The median follow-up time for supported and unsupported Ross patients without a Konno enlargement was 2.90 years (0.21-13.03 years) and 12.13 years (2.63-19.47 years), respectively. Unsupported Ross patients experienced a higher rate of change per year in the aortic annulus (P = .003 and P = .014) and aortic sinus (P = .002 and P = .002) diameters, respectively. There was no significant difference in the rate of change of end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter (P = .703 and P = .92) and aortic insufficiency (P = .687 and P = .215) between the supported and unsupported Ross patients. Conclusions: Progressive dilation of the neoaortic root in unsupported Ross patients is significantly mitigated with the supported Ross with excellent stability. The supported Ross is safe and effective and may play an increasing role in the management of children with aortic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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