The use of backscattered electron imaging and transmission electron microscopy to assess bone architecture and mineral loci: Effect of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride therapy

Joseph E. Zerwekh, Dennis Bellotto, Kenneth S. Prostak, Herbert K. Hagler, Charles Y C Pak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-86
Number of pages8
JournalMicroscopy and Microanalysis
Volume2
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

sodium fluorides
loci
bones
therapy
Bone
Minerals
Biopsy
Sodium
minerals
Transmission electron microscopy
Imaging techniques
transmission electron microscopy
Electrons
electrons
pretreatment
calcium
Crystals
Calcium
osteogenesis
crystals

Keywords

  • Backscattered electron imaging
  • Fluoride
  • Osteoporosis
  • Transmission electron microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

The use of backscattered electron imaging and transmission electron microscopy to assess bone architecture and mineral loci : Effect of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride therapy. / Zerwekh, Joseph E.; Bellotto, Dennis; Prostak, Kenneth S.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Pak, Charles Y C.

In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1996, p. 79-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{81b8d067e0fe4e1f8de59b7cb570fae5,
title = "The use of backscattered electron imaging and transmission electron microscopy to assess bone architecture and mineral loci: Effect of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride therapy",
abstract = "Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.",
keywords = "Backscattered electron imaging, Fluoride, Osteoporosis, Transmission electron microscopy",
author = "Zerwekh, {Joseph E.} and Dennis Bellotto and Prostak, {Kenneth S.} and Hagler, {Herbert K.} and Pak, {Charles Y C}",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "79--86",
journal = "Microscopy and Microanalysis",
issn = "1431-9276",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The use of backscattered electron imaging and transmission electron microscopy to assess bone architecture and mineral loci

T2 - Effect of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride therapy

AU - Zerwekh, Joseph E.

AU - Bellotto, Dennis

AU - Prostak, Kenneth S.

AU - Hagler, Herbert K.

AU - Pak, Charles Y C

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

AB - Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

KW - Backscattered electron imaging

KW - Fluoride

KW - Osteoporosis

KW - Transmission electron microscopy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0342638466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0342638466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0342638466

VL - 2

SP - 79

EP - 86

JO - Microscopy and Microanalysis

JF - Microscopy and Microanalysis

SN - 1431-9276

IS - 2

ER -