The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy: Evaluation of safety and efficacy

Michael G. Corneille, Theresa M. Gallup, Thomas Bening, Steven E. Wolf, Caitlin Brougher, John G. Myers, Daniel L. Dent, Gabriel Medrano, Elly Xenakis, Ronald M. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laparoscopic surgery in pregnant women has become increasingly more common since the 1990s; however, the safety of laparoscopy in this population has been widely debated, particularly in emergent and urgent situations. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all pregnant women following a nonobstetric abdominal operation at a University hospital between 1993 and 2007. Perioperative morbidity and mortality for the mother and fetus were evaluated. Results: Ninety-four subjects were identified; 53 underwent laparoscopic procedures and 41 underwent open procedures. Cholecystectomy and appendectomy were performed in both groups with salpingectomy/ovarian cystectomy only in the laparoscopic group. No maternal deaths occurred, while fetal loss occurred in 3 cases within 7 days of the operation and in 1 case 7 weeks postoperatively. This and other perinatal complications occurred in 36.7% of the laparoscopic group and 41.7% of the open group. Conclusion: Laparoscopic appendectomy and cholecystectomy appear to be as safe as the respective open procedures in pregnant patients; however, this population in particular remains at risk for perinatal complications regardless of the method of abdominal access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-367
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume200
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Laparoscopy
Safety
Pregnancy
Appendectomy
Pregnant Women
Salpingectomy
Maternal Death
Cystectomy
Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Cholecystectomy
Population
Fetus
Mothers
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Appendicitis
  • Cholecystitis
  • Laparoscopy
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy outcome
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Corneille, M. G., Gallup, T. M., Bening, T., Wolf, S. E., Brougher, C., Myers, J. G., ... Stewart, R. M. (2010). The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy: Evaluation of safety and efficacy. American Journal of Surgery, 200(3), 363-367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.09.022

The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy : Evaluation of safety and efficacy. / Corneille, Michael G.; Gallup, Theresa M.; Bening, Thomas; Wolf, Steven E.; Brougher, Caitlin; Myers, John G.; Dent, Daniel L.; Medrano, Gabriel; Xenakis, Elly; Stewart, Ronald M.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 200, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 363-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corneille, MG, Gallup, TM, Bening, T, Wolf, SE, Brougher, C, Myers, JG, Dent, DL, Medrano, G, Xenakis, E & Stewart, RM 2010, 'The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy: Evaluation of safety and efficacy', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 200, no. 3, pp. 363-367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.09.022
Corneille MG, Gallup TM, Bening T, Wolf SE, Brougher C, Myers JG et al. The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy: Evaluation of safety and efficacy. American Journal of Surgery. 2010 Sep;200(3):363-367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.09.022
Corneille, Michael G. ; Gallup, Theresa M. ; Bening, Thomas ; Wolf, Steven E. ; Brougher, Caitlin ; Myers, John G. ; Dent, Daniel L. ; Medrano, Gabriel ; Xenakis, Elly ; Stewart, Ronald M. / The use of laparoscopic surgery in pregnancy : Evaluation of safety and efficacy. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 200, No. 3. pp. 363-367.
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