Therapy for anogenital verrucae in preadolescent children with topical and systemic treatment

Bahir H. Chamseddin, Nnenna G Agim, Jason Jarin, Ellen E Wilson, Adnan Mir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Anogenital verrucae (AV) are benign, human papillomavirus (HPV)–induced tumors of the anogenital skin and mucosa. Medical therapy for AV in preadolescents has not been well studied. We explore the efficacy and safety profile of sinecatechins 15% ointment and imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of AV, alone and in combination therapy with other commonly used medications. Methods: A single-institution, retrospective review of children under 12 years of age with AV treated with imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment was performed. Demographic data, side effects, and outcomes of therapy were recorded for each patient, and overall efficacy was determined. Results: A total of 37 patients met inclusion criteria. Responses were seen in 8 out of 9 patients treated with sinecatechins 15% ointment (5 full, 3 partial, and 1 no response) and 9 out of 17 patients treated with imiquimod 5% cream (4 full, 5 partial, and 8 no response). Combination therapy with one or more of the following treatments (podophyllin, cimetidine, candida antigen injection, and HPV vaccine) were evaluated, but no combination was objectively superior to the others. No significant difference was found in overall efficacy between sinecatechins and imiquimod. Side effects were mild and limited to irritation and erythema. Conclusions: Both imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment are moderately effective in the treatment of AV in preadolescent children, with a trend toward greater effectiveness of sinecatechins. Combination therapy with other treatments did not significantly increase the effectiveness of topical therapies. Each modality has a tolerable side effect profile with a low risk of serious complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Dermatology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Warts
imiquimod
Ointments
Therapeutics
Podophyllin
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Cimetidine
Erythema
Candida
Mucous Membrane
Demography
Safety
Antigens
Skin
Injections

Keywords

  • anogenital warts
  • children
  • condyloma acuminata
  • imiquimod
  • preadolescent
  • sinecatechins
  • systemic treatment
  • topical treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

Cite this

@article{049892252d6e49f7b69b4f0fa3f7439f,
title = "Therapy for anogenital verrucae in preadolescent children with topical and systemic treatment",
abstract = "Background/Objectives: Anogenital verrucae (AV) are benign, human papillomavirus (HPV)–induced tumors of the anogenital skin and mucosa. Medical therapy for AV in preadolescents has not been well studied. We explore the efficacy and safety profile of sinecatechins 15{\%} ointment and imiquimod 5{\%} cream in the treatment of AV, alone and in combination therapy with other commonly used medications. Methods: A single-institution, retrospective review of children under 12 years of age with AV treated with imiquimod 5{\%} cream and sinecatechins 15{\%} ointment was performed. Demographic data, side effects, and outcomes of therapy were recorded for each patient, and overall efficacy was determined. Results: A total of 37 patients met inclusion criteria. Responses were seen in 8 out of 9 patients treated with sinecatechins 15{\%} ointment (5 full, 3 partial, and 1 no response) and 9 out of 17 patients treated with imiquimod 5{\%} cream (4 full, 5 partial, and 8 no response). Combination therapy with one or more of the following treatments (podophyllin, cimetidine, candida antigen injection, and HPV vaccine) were evaluated, but no combination was objectively superior to the others. No significant difference was found in overall efficacy between sinecatechins and imiquimod. Side effects were mild and limited to irritation and erythema. Conclusions: Both imiquimod 5{\%} cream and sinecatechins 15{\%} ointment are moderately effective in the treatment of AV in preadolescent children, with a trend toward greater effectiveness of sinecatechins. Combination therapy with other treatments did not significantly increase the effectiveness of topical therapies. Each modality has a tolerable side effect profile with a low risk of serious complications.",
keywords = "anogenital warts, children, condyloma acuminata, imiquimod, preadolescent, sinecatechins, systemic treatment, topical treatment",
author = "Chamseddin, {Bahir H.} and Agim, {Nnenna G} and Jason Jarin and Wilson, {Ellen E} and Adnan Mir",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/pde.13881",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Pediatric Dermatology",
issn = "0736-8046",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Therapy for anogenital verrucae in preadolescent children with topical and systemic treatment

AU - Chamseddin, Bahir H.

AU - Agim, Nnenna G

AU - Jarin, Jason

AU - Wilson, Ellen E

AU - Mir, Adnan

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background/Objectives: Anogenital verrucae (AV) are benign, human papillomavirus (HPV)–induced tumors of the anogenital skin and mucosa. Medical therapy for AV in preadolescents has not been well studied. We explore the efficacy and safety profile of sinecatechins 15% ointment and imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of AV, alone and in combination therapy with other commonly used medications. Methods: A single-institution, retrospective review of children under 12 years of age with AV treated with imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment was performed. Demographic data, side effects, and outcomes of therapy were recorded for each patient, and overall efficacy was determined. Results: A total of 37 patients met inclusion criteria. Responses were seen in 8 out of 9 patients treated with sinecatechins 15% ointment (5 full, 3 partial, and 1 no response) and 9 out of 17 patients treated with imiquimod 5% cream (4 full, 5 partial, and 8 no response). Combination therapy with one or more of the following treatments (podophyllin, cimetidine, candida antigen injection, and HPV vaccine) were evaluated, but no combination was objectively superior to the others. No significant difference was found in overall efficacy between sinecatechins and imiquimod. Side effects were mild and limited to irritation and erythema. Conclusions: Both imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment are moderately effective in the treatment of AV in preadolescent children, with a trend toward greater effectiveness of sinecatechins. Combination therapy with other treatments did not significantly increase the effectiveness of topical therapies. Each modality has a tolerable side effect profile with a low risk of serious complications.

AB - Background/Objectives: Anogenital verrucae (AV) are benign, human papillomavirus (HPV)–induced tumors of the anogenital skin and mucosa. Medical therapy for AV in preadolescents has not been well studied. We explore the efficacy and safety profile of sinecatechins 15% ointment and imiquimod 5% cream in the treatment of AV, alone and in combination therapy with other commonly used medications. Methods: A single-institution, retrospective review of children under 12 years of age with AV treated with imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment was performed. Demographic data, side effects, and outcomes of therapy were recorded for each patient, and overall efficacy was determined. Results: A total of 37 patients met inclusion criteria. Responses were seen in 8 out of 9 patients treated with sinecatechins 15% ointment (5 full, 3 partial, and 1 no response) and 9 out of 17 patients treated with imiquimod 5% cream (4 full, 5 partial, and 8 no response). Combination therapy with one or more of the following treatments (podophyllin, cimetidine, candida antigen injection, and HPV vaccine) were evaluated, but no combination was objectively superior to the others. No significant difference was found in overall efficacy between sinecatechins and imiquimod. Side effects were mild and limited to irritation and erythema. Conclusions: Both imiquimod 5% cream and sinecatechins 15% ointment are moderately effective in the treatment of AV in preadolescent children, with a trend toward greater effectiveness of sinecatechins. Combination therapy with other treatments did not significantly increase the effectiveness of topical therapies. Each modality has a tolerable side effect profile with a low risk of serious complications.

KW - anogenital warts

KW - children

KW - condyloma acuminata

KW - imiquimod

KW - preadolescent

KW - sinecatechins

KW - systemic treatment

KW - topical treatment

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U2 - 10.1111/pde.13881

DO - 10.1111/pde.13881

M3 - Article

C2 - 31197875

AN - SCOPUS:85067668147

JO - Pediatric Dermatology

JF - Pediatric Dermatology

SN - 0736-8046

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