Time to colonoscopy after positive fecal blood test in four U.S. health care systems

Jessica Chubak, Michael P. Garcia, Andrea N. Burnett-Hartman, Yingye Zheng, Douglas A. Corley, Ethan A. Halm, Amit G. Singal, Carrie N. Klabunde, Chyke A. Doubeni, Aruna Kamineni, Theodore R. Levin, Joanne E. Schottinger, Beverly B. Green, Virginia P. Quinn, Carolyn M. Rutter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To reduce colorectal cancer mortality, positive fecal blood tests must be followed by colonoscopy. Methods: We identified 62,384 individuals ages 50 to 89 years with a positive fecal blood test between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 in four health care systems within the Population-Based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium. We estimated the probability of follow-up colonoscopy and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall differences in cumulative incidence of follow-up across health care systems were assessed with the log-rank test. HRs and 95% CIs were estimated from multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Most patients who received a colonoscopy did so within 6 months of their positive fecal blood test, although follow-up rates varied across health care systems (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-350
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Hematologic Tests
Colonoscopy
Delivery of Health Care
Proportional Hazards Models
Colorectal Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Incidence
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Time to colonoscopy after positive fecal blood test in four U.S. health care systems. / Chubak, Jessica; Garcia, Michael P.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Zheng, Yingye; Corley, Douglas A.; Halm, Ethan A.; Singal, Amit G.; Klabunde, Carrie N.; Doubeni, Chyke A.; Kamineni, Aruna; Levin, Theodore R.; Schottinger, Joanne E.; Green, Beverly B.; Quinn, Virginia P.; Rutter, Carolyn M.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 344-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chubak, J, Garcia, MP, Burnett-Hartman, AN, Zheng, Y, Corley, DA, Halm, EA, Singal, AG, Klabunde, CN, Doubeni, CA, Kamineni, A, Levin, TR, Schottinger, JE, Green, BB, Quinn, VP & Rutter, CM 2016, 'Time to colonoscopy after positive fecal blood test in four U.S. health care systems', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 344-350. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0470
Chubak, Jessica ; Garcia, Michael P. ; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N. ; Zheng, Yingye ; Corley, Douglas A. ; Halm, Ethan A. ; Singal, Amit G. ; Klabunde, Carrie N. ; Doubeni, Chyke A. ; Kamineni, Aruna ; Levin, Theodore R. ; Schottinger, Joanne E. ; Green, Beverly B. ; Quinn, Virginia P. ; Rutter, Carolyn M. / Time to colonoscopy after positive fecal blood test in four U.S. health care systems. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 344-350.
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