Time to surgery and preoperative cerebral hemodynamics predict postoperative white matter injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

Jennifer M. Lynch, Erin M. Buckley, Peter J. Schwab, Ann L. McCarthy, Madeline E. Winters, David R. Busch, Rui Xiao, Donna A. Goff, Susan C. Nicolson, Lisa M. Montenegro, Stephanie Fuller, J. William Gaynor, Thomas L. Spray, Arjun G. Yodh, Maryam Y. Naim, Daniel J. Licht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Hypoxic-ischemic white mater brain injury commonly occurs in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Approximately one half of HLHS survivors will exhibit neurobehavioral symptoms believed to be associated with this injury, although the exact timing of the injury is unknown.

Methods Neonates with HLHS were recruited for pre- and postoperative monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral blood flow using 2 noninvasive optical-based techniques: diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Anatomic magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and approximately 1 week after surgery to quantify the extent and timing of the acquired white matter injury. The risk factors for developing new or worsened white matter injury were assessed using uni- and multivariate logistic regression.

Results A total of 37 neonates with HLHS were studied. On univariate analysis, neonates who developed a large volume of new, or worsened, postoperative white matter injury had a significantly longer time to surgery (P =.0003). In a multivariate model, a longer time between birth and surgery, delayed sternal closure, and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow were predictors of postoperative white matter injury. Additionally, a longer time to surgery and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow on the morning of surgery correlated with lower cerebral oxygen saturation (P =.03 and P =.05, respectively) and greater oxygen extraction fraction (P =.05 for both).

Conclusions A longer time to surgery was associated with new postoperative white matter injury in otherwise healthy neonates with HLHS. The results suggest that earlier Norwood palliation might decrease the likelihood of acquiring postoperative white matter injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2181-2188
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume148
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
Hemodynamics
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Wounds and Injuries
Oxygen
Spectrum Analysis
White Matter
Brain Injuries
Logistic Models
Mothers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Time to surgery and preoperative cerebral hemodynamics predict postoperative white matter injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. / Lynch, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Erin M.; Schwab, Peter J.; McCarthy, Ann L.; Winters, Madeline E.; Busch, David R.; Xiao, Rui; Goff, Donna A.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Fuller, Stephanie; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Licht, Daniel J.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 148, No. 5, 01.11.2014, p. 2181-2188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, JM, Buckley, EM, Schwab, PJ, McCarthy, AL, Winters, ME, Busch, DR, Xiao, R, Goff, DA, Nicolson, SC, Montenegro, LM, Fuller, S, Gaynor, JW, Spray, TL, Yodh, AG, Naim, MY & Licht, DJ 2014, 'Time to surgery and preoperative cerebral hemodynamics predict postoperative white matter injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome', Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 148, no. 5, pp. 2181-2188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2014.05.081
Lynch, Jennifer M. ; Buckley, Erin M. ; Schwab, Peter J. ; McCarthy, Ann L. ; Winters, Madeline E. ; Busch, David R. ; Xiao, Rui ; Goff, Donna A. ; Nicolson, Susan C. ; Montenegro, Lisa M. ; Fuller, Stephanie ; Gaynor, J. William ; Spray, Thomas L. ; Yodh, Arjun G. ; Naim, Maryam Y. ; Licht, Daniel J. / Time to surgery and preoperative cerebral hemodynamics predict postoperative white matter injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 148, No. 5. pp. 2181-2188.
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T1 - Time to surgery and preoperative cerebral hemodynamics predict postoperative white matter injury in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

AU - Lynch, Jennifer M.

AU - Buckley, Erin M.

AU - Schwab, Peter J.

AU - McCarthy, Ann L.

AU - Winters, Madeline E.

AU - Busch, David R.

AU - Xiao, Rui

AU - Goff, Donna A.

AU - Nicolson, Susan C.

AU - Montenegro, Lisa M.

AU - Fuller, Stephanie

AU - Gaynor, J. William

AU - Spray, Thomas L.

AU - Yodh, Arjun G.

AU - Naim, Maryam Y.

AU - Licht, Daniel J.

PY - 2014/11/1

Y1 - 2014/11/1

N2 - Objective Hypoxic-ischemic white mater brain injury commonly occurs in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Approximately one half of HLHS survivors will exhibit neurobehavioral symptoms believed to be associated with this injury, although the exact timing of the injury is unknown.Methods Neonates with HLHS were recruited for pre- and postoperative monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral blood flow using 2 noninvasive optical-based techniques: diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Anatomic magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and approximately 1 week after surgery to quantify the extent and timing of the acquired white matter injury. The risk factors for developing new or worsened white matter injury were assessed using uni- and multivariate logistic regression.Results A total of 37 neonates with HLHS were studied. On univariate analysis, neonates who developed a large volume of new, or worsened, postoperative white matter injury had a significantly longer time to surgery (P =.0003). In a multivariate model, a longer time between birth and surgery, delayed sternal closure, and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow were predictors of postoperative white matter injury. Additionally, a longer time to surgery and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow on the morning of surgery correlated with lower cerebral oxygen saturation (P =.03 and P =.05, respectively) and greater oxygen extraction fraction (P =.05 for both).Conclusions A longer time to surgery was associated with new postoperative white matter injury in otherwise healthy neonates with HLHS. The results suggest that earlier Norwood palliation might decrease the likelihood of acquiring postoperative white matter injury.

AB - Objective Hypoxic-ischemic white mater brain injury commonly occurs in neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Approximately one half of HLHS survivors will exhibit neurobehavioral symptoms believed to be associated with this injury, although the exact timing of the injury is unknown.Methods Neonates with HLHS were recruited for pre- and postoperative monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation, cerebral oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral blood flow using 2 noninvasive optical-based techniques: diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Anatomic magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and approximately 1 week after surgery to quantify the extent and timing of the acquired white matter injury. The risk factors for developing new or worsened white matter injury were assessed using uni- and multivariate logistic regression.Results A total of 37 neonates with HLHS were studied. On univariate analysis, neonates who developed a large volume of new, or worsened, postoperative white matter injury had a significantly longer time to surgery (P =.0003). In a multivariate model, a longer time between birth and surgery, delayed sternal closure, and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow were predictors of postoperative white matter injury. Additionally, a longer time to surgery and greater preoperative cerebral blood flow on the morning of surgery correlated with lower cerebral oxygen saturation (P =.03 and P =.05, respectively) and greater oxygen extraction fraction (P =.05 for both).Conclusions A longer time to surgery was associated with new postoperative white matter injury in otherwise healthy neonates with HLHS. The results suggest that earlier Norwood palliation might decrease the likelihood of acquiring postoperative white matter injury.

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