Torque teno virus 10 isolated by genome amplification techniques from a patient with concomitant chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera

Charles C. Chu, Lu Zhang, Arjun Dhayalan, Briana M. Agagnina, Amanda R. Magli, Gia Fraher, Sebastien Didier, Linda P. Johnson, William J. Kennedy, Rajendra N. Damle, Xiao Jie Yan, Piers E M Patten, Saul Teichberg, Prasad Koduru, Jonathan E. Kolitz, Steven L. Allen, Kanti R. Rai, Nicholas Chiorazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

An infectious etiology has been proposed for many human cancers, but rarely have specific agents been identified. One difficulty has been the need to propagate cancer cells in vitro to produce the infectious agent in detectable quantity. We hypothesized that genome amplification from small numbers of cells could be adapted to circumvent this difficulty. A patient with concomitant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and polycythemia vera (PV) requiring therapeutic phlebotomy donated a large amount of phlebotomized blood to test this possibility. Using genome amplification methods, we identified a new isolate (BIS8-17) of torque teno virus (TTV) 10. The presence of blood isolate sequence 8-17 (BIS8-17) in the original plasma was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), validating the approach, since TTV is a known plasma virus. Subsequent PCR testing of plasmas from additional patients showed that BIS8-17 had a similar incidence (~20%) in CLL (n = 48) or PV (n = 10) compared with healthy controls (n = 52). CLL cells do not harbor BIS8-17; PCR did not detect it in CLL peripheral blood genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (n = 20). CLL patient clinical outcome or prognostic markers (immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region [IGHV] mutation, CD38 or zeta-chain associated protein kinase 70kDa [ZAP-70]) did not correlate with BIS8-17 infection. Although not causative to our knowledge, this is the first reported isolation and detection of TTV in either CLL or PV. TTV could serve as a covirus with another infectious agent or TTV variant with rearranged genetic components that contribute to disease pathogenesis. These results prove that this method identifies infectious agents and provides an experimental methodology to test correlation with disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1338-1348
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Medicine
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Torque teno virus
Polycythemia Vera
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Genome
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains
Phlebotomy
Hematologic Tests
Protein Kinases
Neoplasms
Cell Count
Viruses
Mutation
DNA
Incidence
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Torque teno virus 10 isolated by genome amplification techniques from a patient with concomitant chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera. / Chu, Charles C.; Zhang, Lu; Dhayalan, Arjun; Agagnina, Briana M.; Magli, Amanda R.; Fraher, Gia; Didier, Sebastien; Johnson, Linda P.; Kennedy, William J.; Damle, Rajendra N.; Yan, Xiao Jie; Patten, Piers E M; Teichberg, Saul; Koduru, Prasad; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chiorazzi, Nicholas.

In: Molecular Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 11, 11.2011, p. 1338-1348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chu, CC, Zhang, L, Dhayalan, A, Agagnina, BM, Magli, AR, Fraher, G, Didier, S, Johnson, LP, Kennedy, WJ, Damle, RN, Yan, XJ, Patten, PEM, Teichberg, S, Koduru, P, Kolitz, JE, Allen, SL, Rai, KR & Chiorazzi, N 2011, 'Torque teno virus 10 isolated by genome amplification techniques from a patient with concomitant chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera', Molecular Medicine, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 1338-1348. https://doi.org/10.2119/molmed.2010.00110
Chu, Charles C. ; Zhang, Lu ; Dhayalan, Arjun ; Agagnina, Briana M. ; Magli, Amanda R. ; Fraher, Gia ; Didier, Sebastien ; Johnson, Linda P. ; Kennedy, William J. ; Damle, Rajendra N. ; Yan, Xiao Jie ; Patten, Piers E M ; Teichberg, Saul ; Koduru, Prasad ; Kolitz, Jonathan E. ; Allen, Steven L. ; Rai, Kanti R. ; Chiorazzi, Nicholas. / Torque teno virus 10 isolated by genome amplification techniques from a patient with concomitant chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera. In: Molecular Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 11. pp. 1338-1348.
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