Total contact casting and chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations: Healing rates by wound location

S. C. Walker, P. A. Helm, G. Pullium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated healing rates of chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations located on the plantar surface of the forefoot (n = 30) versus those located on other parts of the foot (n = 25). Each type of ulceration was treated with total contact casting. Ulcerations in the first group were located on the metatarsal heads and toes, while ulcerations in the second group were located on the dorsum of the foot, heel, plantar arch, ankle, medial aspect of foot, and toe or transmetatarsal amputation sites. Successfully healed diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations treated with total contact casting were rated according to patient age, ethnic origin, sex, patient weight, ulcer size, ulcer location, duration of ulcer prior to casting, and ulcer grade. Analysis of variance and posthoc analyses demonstrated that (1) total contact casting was a highly effective method of treatment regardless of ulcer location (forefoot ulcer healing time mean = 30.6 days; nonforefoot ulcer healing time mean = 42.1 days) and (2) forefoot ulcerations healed significantly faster than ulcerations located on other parts of the foot. Complex correlational relationships were explored in this study, and multiple regression equations were developed for each location grouping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-221
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume68
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Diabetic Foot
Wound Healing
Ulcer
Foot
Toes
Analysis of Variance
Metatarsal Bones
Heel
Amputation
Ankle
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Total contact casting and chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations : Healing rates by wound location. / Walker, S. C.; Helm, P. A.; Pullium, G.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 68, No. 4, 1987, p. 217-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3f48043965e142b2a9442a5589d69263,
title = "Total contact casting and chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations: Healing rates by wound location",
abstract = "This study investigated healing rates of chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations located on the plantar surface of the forefoot (n = 30) versus those located on other parts of the foot (n = 25). Each type of ulceration was treated with total contact casting. Ulcerations in the first group were located on the metatarsal heads and toes, while ulcerations in the second group were located on the dorsum of the foot, heel, plantar arch, ankle, medial aspect of foot, and toe or transmetatarsal amputation sites. Successfully healed diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations treated with total contact casting were rated according to patient age, ethnic origin, sex, patient weight, ulcer size, ulcer location, duration of ulcer prior to casting, and ulcer grade. Analysis of variance and posthoc analyses demonstrated that (1) total contact casting was a highly effective method of treatment regardless of ulcer location (forefoot ulcer healing time mean = 30.6 days; nonforefoot ulcer healing time mean = 42.1 days) and (2) forefoot ulcerations healed significantly faster than ulcerations located on other parts of the foot. Complex correlational relationships were explored in this study, and multiple regression equations were developed for each location grouping.",
author = "Walker, {S. C.} and Helm, {P. A.} and G. Pullium",
year = "1987",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "217--221",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Total contact casting and chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations

T2 - Healing rates by wound location

AU - Walker, S. C.

AU - Helm, P. A.

AU - Pullium, G.

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - This study investigated healing rates of chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations located on the plantar surface of the forefoot (n = 30) versus those located on other parts of the foot (n = 25). Each type of ulceration was treated with total contact casting. Ulcerations in the first group were located on the metatarsal heads and toes, while ulcerations in the second group were located on the dorsum of the foot, heel, plantar arch, ankle, medial aspect of foot, and toe or transmetatarsal amputation sites. Successfully healed diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations treated with total contact casting were rated according to patient age, ethnic origin, sex, patient weight, ulcer size, ulcer location, duration of ulcer prior to casting, and ulcer grade. Analysis of variance and posthoc analyses demonstrated that (1) total contact casting was a highly effective method of treatment regardless of ulcer location (forefoot ulcer healing time mean = 30.6 days; nonforefoot ulcer healing time mean = 42.1 days) and (2) forefoot ulcerations healed significantly faster than ulcerations located on other parts of the foot. Complex correlational relationships were explored in this study, and multiple regression equations were developed for each location grouping.

AB - This study investigated healing rates of chronic diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations located on the plantar surface of the forefoot (n = 30) versus those located on other parts of the foot (n = 25). Each type of ulceration was treated with total contact casting. Ulcerations in the first group were located on the metatarsal heads and toes, while ulcerations in the second group were located on the dorsum of the foot, heel, plantar arch, ankle, medial aspect of foot, and toe or transmetatarsal amputation sites. Successfully healed diabetic neuropathic foot ulcerations treated with total contact casting were rated according to patient age, ethnic origin, sex, patient weight, ulcer size, ulcer location, duration of ulcer prior to casting, and ulcer grade. Analysis of variance and posthoc analyses demonstrated that (1) total contact casting was a highly effective method of treatment regardless of ulcer location (forefoot ulcer healing time mean = 30.6 days; nonforefoot ulcer healing time mean = 42.1 days) and (2) forefoot ulcerations healed significantly faster than ulcerations located on other parts of the foot. Complex correlational relationships were explored in this study, and multiple regression equations were developed for each location grouping.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023217818&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023217818&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3566513

AN - SCOPUS:0023217818

VL - 68

SP - 217

EP - 221

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 4

ER -