Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip

Megan A. Swanson, Michael H. Huo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Altered biomechanics secondary to hip ankylosis often result in degeneration of the lumbar spine, ipsilateral knee, and contralateral hip and knee. Symptoms in these joints may be reduced with conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) of the ankylosed hip. THA in the ankylosed hip is a technically challenging procedure, and the overall clinical outcome is generally less satisfactory than routine THA performed for osteoarthritis and other etiologies. Functional integrity of the hip abductor muscles is the most important predictor of walking ability following conversion THA. Many patients experience persistent limp, and it can take up to 2 years to fully assess final functional outcome. Risk factors cited for increased risk of failed THA include prior surgical ankylosis and age <50 years at the time of conversion THA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)737-745
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume19
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 2011

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Arthroplasty
Hip
Ankylosis
Knee
Biomechanical Phenomena
Osteoarthritis
Walking
Spine
Joints
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip. / Swanson, Megan A.; Huo, Michael H.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Vol. 19, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 737-745.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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