Trajectories of Life Satisfaction After Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms

Shannon B. Juengst, Jennifer A. Bogner, Therese M. O'Neil-Pirozzi, Tessa Hart, Charles H. Bombardier, Leah M. Adams, Patricia M. Arenth, Laura E. Dreer, Thomas F. Bergquist, Marcel P. Dijkers, Amy K. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: (a) Identify life satisfaction trajectories after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (b) establish a predictive model for these trajectories across the first 5 years postinjury; and (c) describe differences in these life satisfaction trajectory groups, focusing on age, depressive symptoms, disability, and participation in specific life roles. Research Method: Analysis of the longitudinal TBI Model Systems National Database was performed on data collected prospectively at 1-, 2-, and 5-years post-TBI. Participants (n = 3,012) had a moderate to severe TBI and were 16 years old and older. Results: Four life satisfaction trajectories were identified across the first 5 years postinjury, including: stable satisfaction, initial satisfaction declining, initial dissatisfaction improving, and stable dissatisfaction. Age, depressive symptoms, cognitive disability, and life role participation as a worker, leisure participant, and/ or religious participant at 1-year postinjury significantly predicted trajectory group membership. Life role participation and depressive symptoms were strong predictors of life satisfaction trajectories across the first 5 years post-TBI. Conclusions: The previously documented loss of life roles and prevalence of depression after a moderate to severe TBI make this a vulnerable population for whom low or declining life satisfaction is a particularly high risk. Examining individual life role participation may help to identify relevant foci for community-based rehabilitation interventions or supports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-364
Number of pages12
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Depression
Traumatic Brain Injury
Leisure Activities
Vulnerable Populations
Rehabilitation
Databases

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Depression
  • Life roles
  • Life satisfaction
  • Participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Trajectories of Life Satisfaction After Traumatic Brain Injury : Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms. / Juengst, Shannon B.; Bogner, Jennifer A.; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M.; Hart, Tessa; Bombardier, Charles H.; Adams, Leah M.; Arenth, Patricia M.; Dreer, Laura E.; Bergquist, Thomas F.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Wagner, Amy K.

In: Rehabilitation Psychology, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.11.2015, p. 353-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juengst, SB, Bogner, JA, O'Neil-Pirozzi, TM, Hart, T, Bombardier, CH, Adams, LM, Arenth, PM, Dreer, LE, Bergquist, TF, Dijkers, MP & Wagner, AK 2015, 'Trajectories of Life Satisfaction After Traumatic Brain Injury: Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms', Rehabilitation Psychology, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 353-364. https://doi.org/10.1037/rep0000056
Juengst, Shannon B. ; Bogner, Jennifer A. ; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M. ; Hart, Tessa ; Bombardier, Charles H. ; Adams, Leah M. ; Arenth, Patricia M. ; Dreer, Laura E. ; Bergquist, Thomas F. ; Dijkers, Marcel P. ; Wagner, Amy K. / Trajectories of Life Satisfaction After Traumatic Brain Injury : Influence of Life Roles, Age, Cognitive Disability, and Depressive Symptoms. In: Rehabilitation Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 353-364.
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