Transforming growth factor-β and breast cancer: Tumor promoting effects of transforming growth factor-β

N. Dumont, C. L. Arteaga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transforming growth factor (TGF)-βs are potent growth inhibitors of normal epithelial cells. In established tumor cell systems, however, the preponderant experimental evidence suggests that TGF-βs can foster tumor-host interactions that indirectly support the viability and/or progression of cancer cells. The timing of this 'TGF-β switch' during the progressive transformation of epithelial cells is not clear. More recent evidence also suggests that autocrine TGF-β signaling is operative in some tumor cells, and can also contribute to tumor invasiveness and metastases independent of an effect on nontumor cells. The dissociation of antiproliferative and matrix associated effects of autocrine TGF-β signaling at a transcriptional level provides for a mechanism(s) by which cancer cells can selectively use this signaling pathway for tumor progression. Data in support of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β signaling can accelerate the natural history of tumors will be reviewed in this section.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalBreast Cancer Research
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

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Transforming Growth Factors
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Epithelial Cells
Growth Inhibitors
Neoplasm Metastasis

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition
  • TGF-β receptors
  • Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Transforming growth factor-β and breast cancer : Tumor promoting effects of transforming growth factor-β. / Dumont, N.; Arteaga, C. L.

In: Breast Cancer Research, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.12.2000, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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