Transition to Surgical Residency: A Multi-Institutional Study of Perceived Intern Preparedness and the Effect of a Formal Residency Preparatory Course in the Fourth Year of Medical School

Rebecca M. Minter, Keith D. Amos, Michael L. Bentz, Patrice Gabler Blair, Christopher Brandt, Jonathan D'Cunha, Elisabeth Davis, Keith A. Delman, Ellen S. Deutsch, Celia Divino, Darra Kingsley, Mary Klingensmith, Sarkis Meterissian, Ajit K. Sachdeva, Kyla Terhune, Paula M. Termuhlen, Patricia B. Mullan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To evaluate interns' perceived preparedness for defined surgical residency responsibilities and to determine whether fourth-year medical school (M4) preparatory courses ("bootcamps") facilitate transition to internship. Method The authors conducted a multi-institutional, mixed-methods study (June 2009) evaluating interns from 11 U.S. and Canadian surgery residency programs. Interns completed structured surveys and answered open-ended reflective questions about their preparedness for their surgery internship. Analyses include t tests comparing ratings of interns who had and had not participated in formal internship preparation programs. The authors calculated Cohen d for effect size and used grounded theory to identify themes in the interns' reflections. Results Of 221 eligible interns, 158 (71.5%) participated. Interns self-reported only moderate preparation for most defined care responsibilities in the medical knowledge and patient care domains but, overall, felt well prepared in the professionalism, interpersonal communication, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice domains. Interns who participated in M4 preparatory curricula had higher self-assessed ratings of surgical technical skills, professionalism, interpersonal communication skills, and overall preparation, at statistically significant levels (P <.05) with medium effect sizes. Themes identified in interns' characterizations of their greatest internship challenges included anxiety or lack of preparation related to performance of technical skills or procedures, managing simultaneous demands, being first responders for critically ill patients, clinical management of predictable postoperative conditions, and difficult communications. Conclusions Entering surgical residency, interns report not feeling prepared to fulfill common clinical and professional responsibilities. As M4 curricula may enhance preparation, programs facilitating transition to residency should be developed and evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1116-1124
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume90
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2015

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internship
interpersonal communication
school
responsibility
surgery
rating
curriculum
communication skills
grounded theory
patient care
communications
anxiety
lack
management
learning
performance
professionalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Transition to Surgical Residency : A Multi-Institutional Study of Perceived Intern Preparedness and the Effect of a Formal Residency Preparatory Course in the Fourth Year of Medical School. / Minter, Rebecca M.; Amos, Keith D.; Bentz, Michael L.; Blair, Patrice Gabler; Brandt, Christopher; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Davis, Elisabeth; Delman, Keith A.; Deutsch, Ellen S.; Divino, Celia; Kingsley, Darra; Klingensmith, Mary; Meterissian, Sarkis; Sachdeva, Ajit K.; Terhune, Kyla; Termuhlen, Paula M.; Mullan, Patricia B.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 90, No. 8, 31.08.2015, p. 1116-1124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Minter, RM, Amos, KD, Bentz, ML, Blair, PG, Brandt, C, D'Cunha, J, Davis, E, Delman, KA, Deutsch, ES, Divino, C, Kingsley, D, Klingensmith, M, Meterissian, S, Sachdeva, AK, Terhune, K, Termuhlen, PM & Mullan, PB 2015, 'Transition to Surgical Residency: A Multi-Institutional Study of Perceived Intern Preparedness and the Effect of a Formal Residency Preparatory Course in the Fourth Year of Medical School', Academic Medicine, vol. 90, no. 8, pp. 1116-1124. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000000680
Minter, Rebecca M. ; Amos, Keith D. ; Bentz, Michael L. ; Blair, Patrice Gabler ; Brandt, Christopher ; D'Cunha, Jonathan ; Davis, Elisabeth ; Delman, Keith A. ; Deutsch, Ellen S. ; Divino, Celia ; Kingsley, Darra ; Klingensmith, Mary ; Meterissian, Sarkis ; Sachdeva, Ajit K. ; Terhune, Kyla ; Termuhlen, Paula M. ; Mullan, Patricia B. / Transition to Surgical Residency : A Multi-Institutional Study of Perceived Intern Preparedness and the Effect of a Formal Residency Preparatory Course in the Fourth Year of Medical School. In: Academic Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 8. pp. 1116-1124.
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abstract = "Purpose To evaluate interns' perceived preparedness for defined surgical residency responsibilities and to determine whether fourth-year medical school (M4) preparatory courses ({"}bootcamps{"}) facilitate transition to internship. Method The authors conducted a multi-institutional, mixed-methods study (June 2009) evaluating interns from 11 U.S. and Canadian surgery residency programs. Interns completed structured surveys and answered open-ended reflective questions about their preparedness for their surgery internship. Analyses include t tests comparing ratings of interns who had and had not participated in formal internship preparation programs. The authors calculated Cohen d for effect size and used grounded theory to identify themes in the interns' reflections. Results Of 221 eligible interns, 158 (71.5{\%}) participated. Interns self-reported only moderate preparation for most defined care responsibilities in the medical knowledge and patient care domains but, overall, felt well prepared in the professionalism, interpersonal communication, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice domains. Interns who participated in M4 preparatory curricula had higher self-assessed ratings of surgical technical skills, professionalism, interpersonal communication skills, and overall preparation, at statistically significant levels (P <.05) with medium effect sizes. Themes identified in interns' characterizations of their greatest internship challenges included anxiety or lack of preparation related to performance of technical skills or procedures, managing simultaneous demands, being first responders for critically ill patients, clinical management of predictable postoperative conditions, and difficult communications. Conclusions Entering surgical residency, interns report not feeling prepared to fulfill common clinical and professional responsibilities. As M4 curricula may enhance preparation, programs facilitating transition to residency should be developed and evaluated.",
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N2 - Purpose To evaluate interns' perceived preparedness for defined surgical residency responsibilities and to determine whether fourth-year medical school (M4) preparatory courses ("bootcamps") facilitate transition to internship. Method The authors conducted a multi-institutional, mixed-methods study (June 2009) evaluating interns from 11 U.S. and Canadian surgery residency programs. Interns completed structured surveys and answered open-ended reflective questions about their preparedness for their surgery internship. Analyses include t tests comparing ratings of interns who had and had not participated in formal internship preparation programs. The authors calculated Cohen d for effect size and used grounded theory to identify themes in the interns' reflections. Results Of 221 eligible interns, 158 (71.5%) participated. Interns self-reported only moderate preparation for most defined care responsibilities in the medical knowledge and patient care domains but, overall, felt well prepared in the professionalism, interpersonal communication, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice domains. Interns who participated in M4 preparatory curricula had higher self-assessed ratings of surgical technical skills, professionalism, interpersonal communication skills, and overall preparation, at statistically significant levels (P <.05) with medium effect sizes. Themes identified in interns' characterizations of their greatest internship challenges included anxiety or lack of preparation related to performance of technical skills or procedures, managing simultaneous demands, being first responders for critically ill patients, clinical management of predictable postoperative conditions, and difficult communications. Conclusions Entering surgical residency, interns report not feeling prepared to fulfill common clinical and professional responsibilities. As M4 curricula may enhance preparation, programs facilitating transition to residency should be developed and evaluated.

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