Translating self-persuasion into an adolescent HPV vaccine promotion intervention for parents attending safety-net clinics

Austin S. Baldwin, Deanna C. Denman, Margarita Sala, Emily G. Marks, L. Aubree Shay, Sobha Fuller, Donna Persaud, Simon Craddock Lee, Celette Sugg Skinner, Deborah J. Wiebe, Jasmin A. Tiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Self-persuasion is an effective behavior change strategy, but has not been translated for low-income, less educated, uninsured populations attending safety-net clinics or to promote human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We developed a tablet-based application (in English and Spanish) to elicit parental self-persuasion for adolescent HPV vaccination and evaluated its feasibility in a safety-net population. Methods: Parents (N. =45) of age-eligible adolescents used the self-persuasion application. Then, during cognitive interviews, staff gathered quantitative and qualitative feedback on the self-persuasion tasks including parental decision stage. Results: The self-persuasion tasks were rated as easy to complete and helpful. We identified six question prompts rated as uniformly helpful, not difficult to answer, and generated non-redundant responses from participants. Among the 33 parents with unvaccinated adolescents, 27 (81.8%) reported deciding to get their adolescent vaccinated after completing the self-persuasion tasks. Conclusions: The self-persuasion application was feasible and resulted in a change in parents' decision stage. Future studies can now test the efficacy of the tablet-based application on HPV vaccination. Practice implications: The self-persuasion application facilitates verbalization of reasons for HPV vaccination in low literacy, safety-net settings. This self-administered application has the potential to be more easily incorporated into clinical practice than other patient education approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 26 2016

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Safety-net Providers
Persuasive Communication
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Parents
Vaccination
Tablets
Safety
Patient Education
Population
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Translating self-persuasion into an adolescent HPV vaccine promotion intervention for parents attending safety-net clinics. / Baldwin, Austin S.; Denman, Deanna C.; Sala, Margarita; Marks, Emily G.; Shay, L. Aubree; Fuller, Sobha; Persaud, Donna; Lee, Simon Craddock; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Wiebe, Deborah J.; Tiro, Jasmin A.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, 26.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baldwin, Austin S. ; Denman, Deanna C. ; Sala, Margarita ; Marks, Emily G. ; Shay, L. Aubree ; Fuller, Sobha ; Persaud, Donna ; Lee, Simon Craddock ; Skinner, Celette Sugg ; Wiebe, Deborah J. ; Tiro, Jasmin A. / Translating self-persuasion into an adolescent HPV vaccine promotion intervention for parents attending safety-net clinics. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2016.
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