Transmission of antimicrobial-resistant staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 9 between pigs and humans, United States

Pranay R. Randad, Jesper Larsen, Hülya Kaya, Nora Pisanic, Carly Ordak, Lance B. Price, Maliha Aziz, Maya L. Nadimpalli, Sarah Rhodes, Jill R. Stewart, Dave C. Love, David Mohr, Meghan F. Davis, Lloyd S. Miller, Devon Hall, Karen C. Carroll, Trish M. Perl, Christopher D. Heaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Transmission of livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 9 (LA-SA CC9) between pigs raised on industrial hog operations (IHO) and humans in the United States is poorly understood. We analyzed whole-genome sequences from 32 international S. aureus CC9 isolates and 49 LA-SA CC9 isolates from IHO pigs and humans who work on or live near IHOs in 10 pig-producing counties in North Carolina, USA. Bioinformatic analysis of sequence data from the 81 isolates demonstrated 3 major LA-SA CC9 clades. North Carolina isolates all fell within a single clade (C3). High-resolution phylogenetic analysis of C3 revealed 2 subclades of intermingled IHO pig and human isolates differing by 0–34 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Our findings suggest that LA-SA CC9 from pigs and humans share a common source and provide evidence of transmission of antimicrobial-resistant LA-SA CC9 between IHO pigs and humans who work on or live near IHOs in North Carolina.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)740-748
Number of pages9
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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