Treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis

A comparison trial of postoperative immunotherapy with specific fungal antigens

Randy J. Folker, Bradley F. Marple, Richard L. Mabry, Cynthia S. Mabry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effect of immunotherapy (IT) with fungal antigens on clinical outcome in patients with allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS). Study Design: Prospective case control. Methods: In this comparison study, 22 patients meeting the diagnostic criteria of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) were evaluated after a mean of 33 months' therapy. All received similar treatment consisting of endoscopic sinus surgery, corticosteroids, and antibiotics as needed for complicating purulent sinusitis. Eleven patients received postoperative immunotherapy (IT) with fungal and nonfungal antigens to which sensitivity had been demonstrated, while the remaining 11 received no immunotherapy. Results: The effect of IT was to significantly improve patient outcome as assessed objectively by an AFS endoscopic mucosal staging system (P < .001) and a sinusitis-specific quality-of-life scale, the Chronic Sinusitis Survey (P = .002). In addition, IT was shown to reduce reliance on systemic (P < .001) and topical nasal (P = .043) corticosteroid therapy to control disease. Follow-up was similar in the two groups and was not a determinant of differences in outcome (P = .7). Conclusions: Results from this study indicate that specific IT with fungal antigens improves patient outcome in AFS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1623-1627
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume108
Issue number11 I
StatePublished - Nov 1998

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Fungal Antigens
Sinusitis
Immunotherapy
Therapeutics
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Nose
Quality of Life
Prospective Studies
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Allergic fungal sinusitis
  • Chronic sinusitis
  • Endoscopic sinus surgery
  • Immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis : A comparison trial of postoperative immunotherapy with specific fungal antigens. / Folker, Randy J.; Marple, Bradley F.; Mabry, Richard L.; Mabry, Cynthia S.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 108, No. 11 I, 11.1998, p. 1623-1627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Folker, Randy J. ; Marple, Bradley F. ; Mabry, Richard L. ; Mabry, Cynthia S. / Treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis : A comparison trial of postoperative immunotherapy with specific fungal antigens. In: Laryngoscope. 1998 ; Vol. 108, No. 11 I. pp. 1623-1627.
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