Treatment of antibody-associated sperm with media containing high serum content: A prospective trial of fertility involving men with high antisperm antibodies following intrauterine insemination

W. Byrd, W. H. Kutteh, B. R. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PROBLEM: Antisperm antibodies (ASAs) associated with the sperm surface can significantly influence oocyte fertilization. We initiated a prospective trial comparing the effect of serum-medium dilution on ASA binding and/or distribution following ejaculation and on subsequent pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI). METHOD: Infertile couples (N = 16) were entered into this prospective randomized protocol where the husband's sperm was at least 50% positive for both IgA and IgG ASAs using the immunobead assay. Couples underwent IUI with washed sperm collected during ejaculation into (a) 10 ml of serum medium made up of 50% maternal serum (antibody negative) in Hepes-buffered medium (SM) or (b) in a sterile cup (DRY). For the following cycle, each couple received the alternate sperm treatment. All patients underwent at least two DRY and two SM collections prior to beginning IUI. Sperm from these collections were analyzed by manual semen analysis, computer-aided semen analysis (CASA), and immunobead testing. All sperm preparations for IUI were analyzed by manual analysis and CASA before IUI. Outcome measures were changes in the distribution and amount of sperm antibody binding, sperm motion parameters, and pregnancy rates following IUI. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Collection of sperm into SM significantly reduces (P < 0.01) the percentage of antibody-bound sperm (54.8% IgA, 60.0% IgG) versus 83.5% IgA and 87.7% IgG with DRY collection. The distribution or pattern of antibody binding to the sperm also was altered by SM. There was no significant difference between the motility of the sperm following collection with SM or DRY sperm as determined by manual and CASA methods. More importantly, there was no statistically significant difference in the pregnancy rates/treatment cycle following SM (3.1% 32 cycles) or DRY (6.7%, 30 cycles). CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that SM collection alters immunobead detectable ASA binding. Localization of ASA binding sites suggests that head-bound antibodies are influenced by SM treatment with little effect on tail-bound antibodies. In spite of the significant reduction of ASAs present on the sperm following SM treatment, there was no influence on pregnancy rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume31
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - 1994

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Insemination
Fertility
Spermatozoa
Antibodies
Serum
Semen Analysis
Pregnancy Rate
Therapeutics
Immunoglobulin A
Ejaculation
Immunoglobulin G
Antibody Binding Sites
Sperm Motility
Spouses
Fertilization
Oocytes

Keywords

  • Antisperm antibodies
  • intrauterine insemination
  • male infertility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

@article{8b1be89eadf24fd3b4a72b7409b9a506,
title = "Treatment of antibody-associated sperm with media containing high serum content: A prospective trial of fertility involving men with high antisperm antibodies following intrauterine insemination",
abstract = "PROBLEM: Antisperm antibodies (ASAs) associated with the sperm surface can significantly influence oocyte fertilization. We initiated a prospective trial comparing the effect of serum-medium dilution on ASA binding and/or distribution following ejaculation and on subsequent pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI). METHOD: Infertile couples (N = 16) were entered into this prospective randomized protocol where the husband's sperm was at least 50{\%} positive for both IgA and IgG ASAs using the immunobead assay. Couples underwent IUI with washed sperm collected during ejaculation into (a) 10 ml of serum medium made up of 50{\%} maternal serum (antibody negative) in Hepes-buffered medium (SM) or (b) in a sterile cup (DRY). For the following cycle, each couple received the alternate sperm treatment. All patients underwent at least two DRY and two SM collections prior to beginning IUI. Sperm from these collections were analyzed by manual semen analysis, computer-aided semen analysis (CASA), and immunobead testing. All sperm preparations for IUI were analyzed by manual analysis and CASA before IUI. Outcome measures were changes in the distribution and amount of sperm antibody binding, sperm motion parameters, and pregnancy rates following IUI. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Collection of sperm into SM significantly reduces (P < 0.01) the percentage of antibody-bound sperm (54.8{\%} IgA, 60.0{\%} IgG) versus 83.5{\%} IgA and 87.7{\%} IgG with DRY collection. The distribution or pattern of antibody binding to the sperm also was altered by SM. There was no significant difference between the motility of the sperm following collection with SM or DRY sperm as determined by manual and CASA methods. More importantly, there was no statistically significant difference in the pregnancy rates/treatment cycle following SM (3.1{\%} 32 cycles) or DRY (6.7{\%}, 30 cycles). CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that SM collection alters immunobead detectable ASA binding. Localization of ASA binding sites suggests that head-bound antibodies are influenced by SM treatment with little effect on tail-bound antibodies. In spite of the significant reduction of ASAs present on the sperm following SM treatment, there was no influence on pregnancy rates.",
keywords = "Antisperm antibodies, intrauterine insemination, male infertility",
author = "W. Byrd and Kutteh, {W. H.} and Carr, {B. R.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
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journal = "American Journal of Reproductive Immunology",
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T1 - Treatment of antibody-associated sperm with media containing high serum content

T2 - A prospective trial of fertility involving men with high antisperm antibodies following intrauterine insemination

AU - Byrd, W.

AU - Kutteh, W. H.

AU - Carr, B. R.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - PROBLEM: Antisperm antibodies (ASAs) associated with the sperm surface can significantly influence oocyte fertilization. We initiated a prospective trial comparing the effect of serum-medium dilution on ASA binding and/or distribution following ejaculation and on subsequent pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI). METHOD: Infertile couples (N = 16) were entered into this prospective randomized protocol where the husband's sperm was at least 50% positive for both IgA and IgG ASAs using the immunobead assay. Couples underwent IUI with washed sperm collected during ejaculation into (a) 10 ml of serum medium made up of 50% maternal serum (antibody negative) in Hepes-buffered medium (SM) or (b) in a sterile cup (DRY). For the following cycle, each couple received the alternate sperm treatment. All patients underwent at least two DRY and two SM collections prior to beginning IUI. Sperm from these collections were analyzed by manual semen analysis, computer-aided semen analysis (CASA), and immunobead testing. All sperm preparations for IUI were analyzed by manual analysis and CASA before IUI. Outcome measures were changes in the distribution and amount of sperm antibody binding, sperm motion parameters, and pregnancy rates following IUI. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Collection of sperm into SM significantly reduces (P < 0.01) the percentage of antibody-bound sperm (54.8% IgA, 60.0% IgG) versus 83.5% IgA and 87.7% IgG with DRY collection. The distribution or pattern of antibody binding to the sperm also was altered by SM. There was no significant difference between the motility of the sperm following collection with SM or DRY sperm as determined by manual and CASA methods. More importantly, there was no statistically significant difference in the pregnancy rates/treatment cycle following SM (3.1% 32 cycles) or DRY (6.7%, 30 cycles). CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that SM collection alters immunobead detectable ASA binding. Localization of ASA binding sites suggests that head-bound antibodies are influenced by SM treatment with little effect on tail-bound antibodies. In spite of the significant reduction of ASAs present on the sperm following SM treatment, there was no influence on pregnancy rates.

AB - PROBLEM: Antisperm antibodies (ASAs) associated with the sperm surface can significantly influence oocyte fertilization. We initiated a prospective trial comparing the effect of serum-medium dilution on ASA binding and/or distribution following ejaculation and on subsequent pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI). METHOD: Infertile couples (N = 16) were entered into this prospective randomized protocol where the husband's sperm was at least 50% positive for both IgA and IgG ASAs using the immunobead assay. Couples underwent IUI with washed sperm collected during ejaculation into (a) 10 ml of serum medium made up of 50% maternal serum (antibody negative) in Hepes-buffered medium (SM) or (b) in a sterile cup (DRY). For the following cycle, each couple received the alternate sperm treatment. All patients underwent at least two DRY and two SM collections prior to beginning IUI. Sperm from these collections were analyzed by manual semen analysis, computer-aided semen analysis (CASA), and immunobead testing. All sperm preparations for IUI were analyzed by manual analysis and CASA before IUI. Outcome measures were changes in the distribution and amount of sperm antibody binding, sperm motion parameters, and pregnancy rates following IUI. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Collection of sperm into SM significantly reduces (P < 0.01) the percentage of antibody-bound sperm (54.8% IgA, 60.0% IgG) versus 83.5% IgA and 87.7% IgG with DRY collection. The distribution or pattern of antibody binding to the sperm also was altered by SM. There was no significant difference between the motility of the sperm following collection with SM or DRY sperm as determined by manual and CASA methods. More importantly, there was no statistically significant difference in the pregnancy rates/treatment cycle following SM (3.1% 32 cycles) or DRY (6.7%, 30 cycles). CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that SM collection alters immunobead detectable ASA binding. Localization of ASA binding sites suggests that head-bound antibodies are influenced by SM treatment with little effect on tail-bound antibodies. In spite of the significant reduction of ASAs present on the sperm following SM treatment, there was no influence on pregnancy rates.

KW - Antisperm antibodies

KW - intrauterine insemination

KW - male infertility

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