Treatment of femoral neck fractures with prosthetic arthroplasty

Victor Wilson, Michael H. Huo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: The incidence of femoral neck fractures continues to increase as the United States population ages. Controversy exists about the best form of treatment. Many authors agree that arthroplasty is the treatment of choice in elderly patients, whereas some continue to recommend internal fixation. This review focuses on the clinical outcomes of using hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures. Recent findings: In reviews of some of the most recent literature, it has been shown that both hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty are successful treatment options for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly. In many patients treated with hemiarthroplasty, acetabluar erosion will develop, with an increased risk of persistent pain. For this reason, a trend toward treating younger, more active patients with total hip arthroplasty has emerged in recent articles. Summary: Overall health care in the United States continues to improve. For this reason, patients can be expected to live longer, more active lives. The durability of selected implants must be a consideration. Both hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty are commonly used for the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures. Total hip arthroplasty may prove to be the best option for active patients to decrease the risk of acetabular erosion and the need for secondary surgical procedures. The authors hope that this review will help guide clinical decisions in treating displaced femoral neck fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-21
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Orthopaedics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

Fingerprint

Femoral Neck Fractures
Arthroplasty
Hemiarthroplasty
Hip
Therapeutics
Delivery of Health Care
Pain
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • Femoral neck fracture
  • Hemiarthroplasty
  • Hip fracture
  • Prosthetic arthroplasty
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Treatment of femoral neck fractures with prosthetic arthroplasty. / Wilson, Victor; Huo, Michael H.

In: Current Opinion in Orthopaedics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 02.2004, p. 18-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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