Treatment of morbid obesity in low-income adolescents: Effects of parental self-monitoring

Daniel S. Kirschenbaum, Julie N. Germann, Barry H. Rich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the extent to which consistency of self-monitoring by participants and their parents was related to weight control over an initial period of 3 months within the context of a treatment program for morbidly obese low-income minority adolescents. Research Methods and Procedures: Eighty-three obese adolescents (mean age, 13.0 years; 51 % boys; 92% African American; mean BMI, 43.0 kg/m 2; mean BMI z-score, 6.0) and at least one parent participated in a long-term treatment program that included a very-low-fat dietary focus, weekly group cognitive-behavior therapy, monthly nutrition education classes, a 12-week physical therapy class, and medical monitoring. Results: Participants who self-monitored on the majority of days compared with those who did not self-monitor at all or who self-monitored infrequently attended more sessions and generally lost more weight over the first 3 months. Although parents signed behavioral contracts committing to self-monitor their own eating and exercising over the first month, only 12% did so. Nonetheless, participants whose parents self-monitored were much more likely to self-monitor consistently and lose weight during the first 3 months. Discussion: These results indicate that self-monitoring is a cornerstone of successful weight control even for morbidly obese low-income minority adolescents; targeting consistency of self-monitoring among these high-risk weight controllers and their parents should be just as important as it is for more affluent and less overweight adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1527-1529
Number of pages3
JournalObesity Research
Volume13
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Morbid Obesity
income
obesity
Weights and Measures
Parents
monitoring
weight control
Therapeutics
Dietary Fats
Cognitive Therapy
Contracts
physical therapy
Focus Groups
behavior modification
African Americans
focus groups
nutrition education
Eating
controllers
research methods

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavior therapy
  • Overweight
  • Self-observation
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Treatment of morbid obesity in low-income adolescents : Effects of parental self-monitoring. / Kirschenbaum, Daniel S.; Germann, Julie N.; Rich, Barry H.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 13, No. 9, 2005, p. 1527-1529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kirschenbaum, Daniel S. ; Germann, Julie N. ; Rich, Barry H. / Treatment of morbid obesity in low-income adolescents : Effects of parental self-monitoring. In: Obesity Research. 2005 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 1527-1529.
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