Tumor size in endometrial cancer

J. C. Schink, A. W. Rademaker, D. S. Miller, J. R. Lurain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tumor size was determined in 142 patients with clinical Stage I endometrial cancer treated primarily by total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymph node biopsies between July 1979 and August 1988. Only 4% of patients with tumor size less than or equal to 2 cm had lymph node metastasis; this increased to 15% for tumors more than 2 cm and increased further to 35% when the entire uterine cavity was involved (multivariate P = 0.01). Five-year survival was 98% for patients with tumors less than or equal to 2 cm, 84% with tumors more than 2 cm, and 64% with tumors involving the whole uterine cavity (Mantel-Cox P = 0.005). For endometrial cancer patients with Grade 2 tumors and less than one-half myometrial invasion, the risk of lymph node metastasis is often considered too low to justify adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy. This intermediate-risk group is better defined by including tumor size as a prognostic factor. For this subgroup (Grade 2, less than one-half endometrial invasion) there were no lymph node metastasis associated with tumors less than 2 cm, but 18% had nodal disease when tumors were larger than 2 cm. Tumor size is an important prognostic factor that is particularly helpful in directing adjuvant radiation therapy in patients without staging lymph node biopsies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2791-2794
Number of pages4
JournalCancer
Volume67
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1991

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Endometrial Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Radiotherapy
Biopsy
Ovariectomy
Hysterectomy
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Schink, J. C., Rademaker, A. W., Miller, D. S., & Lurain, J. R. (1991). Tumor size in endometrial cancer. Cancer, 67(11), 2791-2794.

Tumor size in endometrial cancer. / Schink, J. C.; Rademaker, A. W.; Miller, D. S.; Lurain, J. R.

In: Cancer, Vol. 67, No. 11, 1991, p. 2791-2794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schink, JC, Rademaker, AW, Miller, DS & Lurain, JR 1991, 'Tumor size in endometrial cancer', Cancer, vol. 67, no. 11, pp. 2791-2794.
Schink JC, Rademaker AW, Miller DS, Lurain JR. Tumor size in endometrial cancer. Cancer. 1991;67(11):2791-2794.
Schink, J. C. ; Rademaker, A. W. ; Miller, D. S. ; Lurain, J. R. / Tumor size in endometrial cancer. In: Cancer. 1991 ; Vol. 67, No. 11. pp. 2791-2794.
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