Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table: A simple alternative to automated-table techniques

Pari V. Pandharipande, Vivian S. Lee, Peter M. Reuss, Hearns W. Charles, Robert J. Rosen, Glenn A. Krinsky, Jeffrey C. Weinreb, Neil M. Rofsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Our purpose was to evaluate a simple, two-station, bolus-chase, peripheral MR angiography technique that relies on manual patient translation using a plastic patient-transfer board. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty patients successfully completed both lower extremity MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography within a 3-month period. For MR angiography, patients were placed on the scanner table on a standard plastic patient-transfer board. We performed unenhanced and contrast-enhanced imaging at the level of the pelvis using a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence (TR range/TE range, 3.8-4.6/1.3-1.8; flip angle range, 25-40°). Then patients were quickly pulled 350-400 mm using the transfer- board handles, and two subsequent acquisitions were obtained at the level of the thighs. For each modality, two radiologists who were unaware of correlative imaging results retrospectively scored all vessel segments as either greater than or equal to 50% stenosis or less than 50% stenosis, and interobserver agreement was determined, Using digital subtraction angiography as the standard of reference, we used consensus data to compute MR angiography sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS. In the 261 vessel segments considered, MR angiography had a sensitivity of 75% (12/16) and a specificity of 98% (94/96) for the detection of stenosis greater than or equal to 50% from the aorta through the common femoral arteries. For the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries, these values were 97% (31/32) and 94% (34/36), respectively. MR angiography interobserver agreement for detection of stenosis was good (κ = 0.68) for the aorta through the common femoral arteries and excellent (κ = 0,88) for the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries. These values were comparable to those found for digital subtraction angiography (κ = 0.67 and κ = 0.88, respectively). CONCLUSION. Stationary-table MR angiography is a useful, simple strategy for lower extremity angiography in centers without a moving table.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1583-1589
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume179
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

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Angiography
Femoral Artery
Digital Subtraction Angiography
Pathologic Constriction
Patient Transfer
Popliteal Artery
Plastics
Aorta
Lower Extremity
Thigh
Pelvis
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Pandharipande, P. V., Lee, V. S., Reuss, P. M., Charles, H. W., Rosen, R. J., Krinsky, G. A., ... Rofsky, N. M. (2002). Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table: A simple alternative to automated-table techniques. American Journal of Roentgenology, 179(6), 1583-1589.

Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table : A simple alternative to automated-table techniques. / Pandharipande, Pari V.; Lee, Vivian S.; Reuss, Peter M.; Charles, Hearns W.; Rosen, Robert J.; Krinsky, Glenn A.; Weinreb, Jeffrey C.; Rofsky, Neil M.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 179, No. 6, 01.12.2002, p. 1583-1589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pandharipande, PV, Lee, VS, Reuss, PM, Charles, HW, Rosen, RJ, Krinsky, GA, Weinreb, JC & Rofsky, NM 2002, 'Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table: A simple alternative to automated-table techniques', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 179, no. 6, pp. 1583-1589.
Pandharipande PV, Lee VS, Reuss PM, Charles HW, Rosen RJ, Krinsky GA et al. Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table: A simple alternative to automated-table techniques. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2002 Dec 1;179(6):1583-1589.
Pandharipande, Pari V. ; Lee, Vivian S. ; Reuss, Peter M. ; Charles, Hearns W. ; Rosen, Robert J. ; Krinsky, Glenn A. ; Weinreb, Jeffrey C. ; Rofsky, Neil M. / Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table : A simple alternative to automated-table techniques. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2002 ; Vol. 179, No. 6. pp. 1583-1589.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. Our purpose was to evaluate a simple, two-station, bolus-chase, peripheral MR angiography technique that relies on manual patient translation using a plastic patient-transfer board. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty patients successfully completed both lower extremity MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography within a 3-month period. For MR angiography, patients were placed on the scanner table on a standard plastic patient-transfer board. We performed unenhanced and contrast-enhanced imaging at the level of the pelvis using a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence (TR range/TE range, 3.8-4.6/1.3-1.8; flip angle range, 25-40°). Then patients were quickly pulled 350-400 mm using the transfer- board handles, and two subsequent acquisitions were obtained at the level of the thighs. For each modality, two radiologists who were unaware of correlative imaging results retrospectively scored all vessel segments as either greater than or equal to 50{\%} stenosis or less than 50{\%} stenosis, and interobserver agreement was determined, Using digital subtraction angiography as the standard of reference, we used consensus data to compute MR angiography sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS. In the 261 vessel segments considered, MR angiography had a sensitivity of 75{\%} (12/16) and a specificity of 98{\%} (94/96) for the detection of stenosis greater than or equal to 50{\%} from the aorta through the common femoral arteries. For the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries, these values were 97{\%} (31/32) and 94{\%} (34/36), respectively. MR angiography interobserver agreement for detection of stenosis was good (κ = 0.68) for the aorta through the common femoral arteries and excellent (κ = 0,88) for the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries. These values were comparable to those found for digital subtraction angiography (κ = 0.67 and κ = 0.88, respectively). CONCLUSION. Stationary-table MR angiography is a useful, simple strategy for lower extremity angiography in centers without a moving table.",
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T1 - Two-station bolus-chase MR angiography with a stationary table

T2 - A simple alternative to automated-table techniques

AU - Pandharipande, Pari V.

AU - Lee, Vivian S.

AU - Reuss, Peter M.

AU - Charles, Hearns W.

AU - Rosen, Robert J.

AU - Krinsky, Glenn A.

AU - Weinreb, Jeffrey C.

AU - Rofsky, Neil M.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE. Our purpose was to evaluate a simple, two-station, bolus-chase, peripheral MR angiography technique that relies on manual patient translation using a plastic patient-transfer board. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty patients successfully completed both lower extremity MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography within a 3-month period. For MR angiography, patients were placed on the scanner table on a standard plastic patient-transfer board. We performed unenhanced and contrast-enhanced imaging at the level of the pelvis using a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence (TR range/TE range, 3.8-4.6/1.3-1.8; flip angle range, 25-40°). Then patients were quickly pulled 350-400 mm using the transfer- board handles, and two subsequent acquisitions were obtained at the level of the thighs. For each modality, two radiologists who were unaware of correlative imaging results retrospectively scored all vessel segments as either greater than or equal to 50% stenosis or less than 50% stenosis, and interobserver agreement was determined, Using digital subtraction angiography as the standard of reference, we used consensus data to compute MR angiography sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS. In the 261 vessel segments considered, MR angiography had a sensitivity of 75% (12/16) and a specificity of 98% (94/96) for the detection of stenosis greater than or equal to 50% from the aorta through the common femoral arteries. For the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries, these values were 97% (31/32) and 94% (34/36), respectively. MR angiography interobserver agreement for detection of stenosis was good (κ = 0.68) for the aorta through the common femoral arteries and excellent (κ = 0,88) for the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries. These values were comparable to those found for digital subtraction angiography (κ = 0.67 and κ = 0.88, respectively). CONCLUSION. Stationary-table MR angiography is a useful, simple strategy for lower extremity angiography in centers without a moving table.

AB - OBJECTIVE. Our purpose was to evaluate a simple, two-station, bolus-chase, peripheral MR angiography technique that relies on manual patient translation using a plastic patient-transfer board. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty patients successfully completed both lower extremity MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography within a 3-month period. For MR angiography, patients were placed on the scanner table on a standard plastic patient-transfer board. We performed unenhanced and contrast-enhanced imaging at the level of the pelvis using a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence (TR range/TE range, 3.8-4.6/1.3-1.8; flip angle range, 25-40°). Then patients were quickly pulled 350-400 mm using the transfer- board handles, and two subsequent acquisitions were obtained at the level of the thighs. For each modality, two radiologists who were unaware of correlative imaging results retrospectively scored all vessel segments as either greater than or equal to 50% stenosis or less than 50% stenosis, and interobserver agreement was determined, Using digital subtraction angiography as the standard of reference, we used consensus data to compute MR angiography sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS. In the 261 vessel segments considered, MR angiography had a sensitivity of 75% (12/16) and a specificity of 98% (94/96) for the detection of stenosis greater than or equal to 50% from the aorta through the common femoral arteries. For the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries, these values were 97% (31/32) and 94% (34/36), respectively. MR angiography interobserver agreement for detection of stenosis was good (κ = 0.68) for the aorta through the common femoral arteries and excellent (κ = 0,88) for the superficial and profunda femoral arteries through the popliteal arteries. These values were comparable to those found for digital subtraction angiography (κ = 0.67 and κ = 0.88, respectively). CONCLUSION. Stationary-table MR angiography is a useful, simple strategy for lower extremity angiography in centers without a moving table.

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