Ultraviolet B - irradiated antigen-presenting cells display altered accessory signaling for T-cell activation

Relevance to immune responses initiated in skin

Jan C. Simon, Jean Krutmann, Craig A. Elmets, Paul R. Bergstresser, Ponciano D Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A principal mechanism by which ultraviolet (UV) B radiation exerts its selective and antigen-specific suppressive influence on immune responses is through its effects on the capacity of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in skin, primarily Langerhans cells (LC), to differentially activate T-cell subsets. Recent evidence has indicated that LC, following UVB radiation, lose the capacity to stimulate proliferation of CD4+ Thl, but not of Th2, clones. Additional work has shown this acquired unresponsiveness of Th1 cells to represent a long-lasting form of clonal anergy that results from a block in their ability to produce IL-2. Although not completely delineated, these defects appear to be the result of preserved delivery of the primary signal transduced by interaction of the MHC/antigen complex on APC with the T-cell receptor complex, in the absence of a viable second signal normally delivered by interaction of a co-stimulatory factor from APC with its appropriate ligand on the T cells. These findings support the notion that the outcome of certain immune responses depends greatly upon conditions that are brought to bear on APC and T cells during the time of antigen presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume98
Issue number6 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jun 1992

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T-cells
Accessories
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Skin
Chemical activation
T-Lymphocytes
Langerhans Cells
Antigens
Clonal Anergy
Radiation
Th1 Cells
Antigen Presentation
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Interleukin-2
Clone Cells
Ligands
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Ultraviolet B - irradiated antigen-presenting cells display altered accessory signaling for T-cell activation : Relevance to immune responses initiated in skin. / Simon, Jan C.; Krutmann, Jean; Elmets, Craig A.; Bergstresser, Paul R.; Cruz, Ponciano D.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 98, No. 6 SUPPL., 06.1992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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