Universal newborn screening: Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction among public health professionals

Laurie Dunn, Katherine Gordon, Julia Sein, Kimberly Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Assess knowledge, attitude, and satisfaction with the newborn screening (NBS) system among pediatric public health leaders in the state of Florida. METHODS: Online surveys and open-ended telephone interviews were administered to 10 county medical directors for a state-funded program that oversees NBS. Survey questions examined basic knowledge regarding NBS, views on provider and parent access to NBS information, and recommendations for improving the information distribution system. RESULTS: Providers learn about NBS from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Department of Health, and continuing medical education; however, 80% of providers were concerned about receiving inadequate information. Thirty percent of the providers surveyed reported that it takes >14 days to receive NBS results. The majority (80%) were concerned that parents may not receive adequate information about their infant's condition, treatment, or prognosis. No provider reported being confident in his or her ability to assess how well a parent understands a positive NBS result. Eighty percent of those surveyed believe that the pediatric primary care provider is responsible for providing NBS information to parents and almost all of the providers (90%) believed parents should be notified of normal NBS results. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates dissatisfaction with and confusion about NBS. Addressing this problem requires action at the levels of medical education, clinical care, health policy, and information systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-222
Number of pages5
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Public Health
Newborn Infant
Parents
Pediatrics
Physician Executives
Health Information Systems
Continuing Medical Education
Aptitude
Information Dissemination
Health Policy
Medical Education
Information Systems
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Health

Keywords

  • communication
  • newborn screening
  • public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Universal newborn screening : Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction among public health professionals. / Dunn, Laurie; Gordon, Katherine; Sein, Julia; Ross, Kimberly.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 105, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 218-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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