Unveiling the roles of autophagy in innate and adaptive immunity

Beth Levine, Vojo Deretic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

625 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cells digest portions of their interiors in a process known as autophagy to recycle nutrients, remodel and dispose of unwanted cytoplasmic constituents. This ancient pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, is now emerging as a central player in the immunological control of bacterial, parasitic and viral infections. The process of autophagy may degrade intracellular pathogens, deliver endogenous antigens to MHC-class-II-loading compartments, direct viral nucleic acids to Toll-like receptors and regulate T-cell homeostasis. This Review describes the mechanisms of autophagy and highlights recent advances relevant to the role of autophagy in innate and adaptive immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)767-777
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Immunology
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

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Autophagy
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Parasitic Diseases
Toll-Like Receptors
Virus Diseases
Bacterial Infections
Nucleic Acids
Homeostasis
Yeasts
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Unveiling the roles of autophagy in innate and adaptive immunity. / Levine, Beth; Deretic, Vojo.

In: Nature Reviews Immunology, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 767-777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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