Update from the SENIC project. Hospital infection control: Recent progress and opportunities under prospective payment

Robert W. Haley, W. Meade Morgan, David H. Culver, John W. White, T. Grace Emori, Janet Mosser, James M. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From a survey of all U.S. hospitals in 1976 and of a random sample in 1983, we found that the intensity of infection surveillance and control activities greatly increased, and the percentage of hospitals with an infection control nurse per 250 beds increased from 22% to 57%. The percentage with a physician trained in infection control remained low (15%), and there was a drop in the percentages of hospitals doing surgical wound infection surveillance (from 90% down to 79%) and reporting surgeon-specific rates to surgeons (from 19% down to 13%). There was an increase in the percentage of hospitals with programs shown to be effective in preventing urinary tract infections, bacteremias, and pneumonias, but not surgical wound infections. The percentage of nosocomial infections being prevented nationwide appears to have increased from 6% to only 9%, whereas 32% could be preveneted if all hospitals adopted the most effective programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-108
Number of pages12
JournalAJIC: American Journal of Infection Control
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

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Infection Control
Cross Infection
Surgical Wound Infection
Bacteremia
Urinary Tract Infections
Pneumonia
Nurses
Physicians
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Update from the SENIC project. Hospital infection control : Recent progress and opportunities under prospective payment. / Haley, Robert W.; Meade Morgan, W.; Culver, David H.; White, John W.; Grace Emori, T.; Mosser, Janet; Hughes, James M.

In: AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 13, No. 3, 1985, p. 97-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haley, Robert W. ; Meade Morgan, W. ; Culver, David H. ; White, John W. ; Grace Emori, T. ; Mosser, Janet ; Hughes, James M. / Update from the SENIC project. Hospital infection control : Recent progress and opportunities under prospective payment. In: AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control. 1985 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 97-108.
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