Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-822
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume72
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Neuromyelitis Optica
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Protons
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Neuroimaging
Imaging
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository (2015). Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. JAMA Neurology, 72(7), 815-822. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.0248

Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. / Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository.

In: JAMA Neurology, Vol. 72, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 815-822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository 2015, 'Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder', JAMA Neurology, vol. 72, no. 7, pp. 815-822. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.0248
Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository. Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. JAMA Neurology. 2015 Jul 1;72(7):815-822. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.0248
Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation (GJCF) Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) International Clinical Consortium and Biorepository. / Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. In: JAMA Neurology. 2015 ; Vol. 72, No. 7. pp. 815-822.
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