Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs

Katrina Armstrong, Jane J. Kim, Ethan A. Halm, Rachel M. Ballard, Mitchell D. Schnall

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1338-1342
Number of pages5
JournalCancer
Volume122
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • implementation
  • lung cancer
  • primary care
  • quality
  • screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this