Using quantitative sensory testing to predict attrition in an interdisciplinary pain management program: a pilot study

Jason Zafereo, Brittany Uhlenbrock, Seth Watson, Sharon Wang-Price, Carl Noe, Robin B. Jarrett, Karen J. Meltzer, Mu Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To determine the extent to which quantitative sensory testing (QST) predicted attrition in an interdisciplinary pain program (IPP). Patients & methods: Participants (n = 53) enrolled in an IPP completed pretreatment assessments of QST and the PROMIS-29 quality of life survey. Results & conclusion: Compared with completers, non-completers (24.5%) reported significantly higher pain intensity (7.1, 95% CI [5.8, 8.4] versus 5.4, 95% CI [4.8, 6.1]) and cold hyperalgesia (14.6°C, 95% CI [8.8, 20.4] versus 7.5°C, 95% CI [4.8, 6.1]), with both variables also predicting attrition. This finding highlights a potentially novel and clinically significant use of QST. Higher overall pain intensity and the presence of remote cold hyperalgesia may identify patients at risk for dropping out of an IPP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-633
Number of pages11
JournalPain management
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • attrition
  • central sensitization
  • chronic pain
  • interdisciplinary pain management program
  • quantitative sensory testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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