V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin

Wei Zhang, Dong Wang, Elzi Volk, Hugo J. Bellen, Peter Robin Hiesinger, Florante A. Quiocho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The V0 complex forms the proteolipid pore of a vesicular ATPase that acidifies vesicles. In addition, an independent function in membrane fusion has been suggested in vacuolar fusion in yeast and synaptic vesicle exocytosis in fly neurons. Evidence for a direct role in secretion has also recently been presented in mouse and worm. The molecular mechanisms of how the V0 components might act or are regulated are largely unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of a calmodulin-binding site in the large cytosolic N-terminal region of the Drosophila protein V100, the neuron-specific V0 subunit a1. V100 forms a tight complex with calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Mutations in the calmodulin-binding site in Drosophila lead to a loss of calmodulin recruitment to synapses. Neuronal expression of a calmodulin-binding deficient V100 uncovers an incomplete rescue at low levels and cellular toxicity at high levels. Our results suggest a vesicular ATPase V0-dependent function of calmodulin at synapses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-300
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume283
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2008

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Calmodulin
Neurons
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Synapses
Fusion reactions
Binding Sites
Proteolipids
Membrane Fusion
Synaptic Vesicles
Exocytosis
Diptera
Yeast
Drosophila
Toxicity
Yeasts
Membranes
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Zhang, W., Wang, D., Volk, E., Bellen, H. J., Hiesinger, P. R., & Quiocho, F. A. (2008). V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 283(1), 294-300. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M708058200

V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin. / Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dong; Volk, Elzi; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hiesinger, Peter Robin; Quiocho, Florante A.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 283, No. 1, 04.01.2008, p. 294-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, W, Wang, D, Volk, E, Bellen, HJ, Hiesinger, PR & Quiocho, FA 2008, 'V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 283, no. 1, pp. 294-300. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M708058200
Zhang W, Wang D, Volk E, Bellen HJ, Hiesinger PR, Quiocho FA. V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2008 Jan 4;283(1):294-300. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M708058200
Zhang, Wei ; Wang, Dong ; Volk, Elzi ; Bellen, Hugo J. ; Hiesinger, Peter Robin ; Quiocho, Florante A. / V-ATPase V0 sector subunit a1 in neurons is a target of calmodulin. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2008 ; Vol. 283, No. 1. pp. 294-300.
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