Vaccinia virus subverts a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein-dependent innate immune response in keratinocytes through its double-stranded RNA binding protein, E3

Liang Deng, Peihong Dai, Tanvi Parikh, Hua Cao, Vijay Bhoj, Qinmiao Sun, Zhijian Chen, Taha Merghoub, Alan Houghton, Stewart Shuman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Skin keratinocytes provide a first line of defense against invading microorganisms in two ways: (i) by acting as a physical barrier to pathogen entry and (ii) by initiating a vigorous innate immune response upon sensing danger signals. How keratinocytes detect virus infections and generate antiviral immune responses is not well understood. Orthopoxviruses are dermatotropic DNA viruses that cause lethal disease in humans. Virulence in animal models depends on the virus-encoded bifunctional Z-DNA/double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein E3. Here, we report that infection of mouse primary keratinocytes with a vaccinia ΔE3L mutant virus triggers the production of beta interferon (IFN-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CCL4, and CCL5. None of these immune mediators is produced by keratinocytes infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. The dsRNA-binding domain of E3 suffices to prevent activation of the innate immune response. ΔE3L induction of IFN-β, IL-6, CCL4, and CCL5 secretion requires mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS; an adaptor for the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors RIG-I and MDA5) and the transcription factor IRF3. IRF3 phosphorylation is induced in keratinocytes infected with ΔE3L, an event that depends on MAVS. The response of keratinocytes to ΔE3L is unaffected by genetic ablation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TRIF, TLR9, and MyD88.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10735-10746
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume82
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Vaccinia virus
RNA-binding proteins
RNA-Binding Proteins
keratinocytes
double-stranded RNA
Keratinocytes
Innate Immunity
Antiviral Agents
Proteins
proteins
interleukin-6
viruses
Interleukin-6
Z-DNA
Orthopoxvirus
Toll-Like Receptor 3
Z-Form DNA
interferon-beta
Viruses
Vaccinia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Vaccinia virus subverts a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein-dependent innate immune response in keratinocytes through its double-stranded RNA binding protein, E3. / Deng, Liang; Dai, Peihong; Parikh, Tanvi; Cao, Hua; Bhoj, Vijay; Sun, Qinmiao; Chen, Zhijian; Merghoub, Taha; Houghton, Alan; Shuman, Stewart.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 82, No. 21, 11.2008, p. 10735-10746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deng, Liang ; Dai, Peihong ; Parikh, Tanvi ; Cao, Hua ; Bhoj, Vijay ; Sun, Qinmiao ; Chen, Zhijian ; Merghoub, Taha ; Houghton, Alan ; Shuman, Stewart. / Vaccinia virus subverts a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein-dependent innate immune response in keratinocytes through its double-stranded RNA binding protein, E3. In: Journal of Virology. 2008 ; Vol. 82, No. 21. pp. 10735-10746.
@article{7dbdfb80824a41cca6c1c746e4d5755c,
title = "Vaccinia virus subverts a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein-dependent innate immune response in keratinocytes through its double-stranded RNA binding protein, E3",
abstract = "Skin keratinocytes provide a first line of defense against invading microorganisms in two ways: (i) by acting as a physical barrier to pathogen entry and (ii) by initiating a vigorous innate immune response upon sensing danger signals. How keratinocytes detect virus infections and generate antiviral immune responses is not well understood. Orthopoxviruses are dermatotropic DNA viruses that cause lethal disease in humans. Virulence in animal models depends on the virus-encoded bifunctional Z-DNA/double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein E3. Here, we report that infection of mouse primary keratinocytes with a vaccinia ΔE3L mutant virus triggers the production of beta interferon (IFN-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CCL4, and CCL5. None of these immune mediators is produced by keratinocytes infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. The dsRNA-binding domain of E3 suffices to prevent activation of the innate immune response. ΔE3L induction of IFN-β, IL-6, CCL4, and CCL5 secretion requires mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS; an adaptor for the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors RIG-I and MDA5) and the transcription factor IRF3. IRF3 phosphorylation is induced in keratinocytes infected with ΔE3L, an event that depends on MAVS. The response of keratinocytes to ΔE3L is unaffected by genetic ablation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TRIF, TLR9, and MyD88.",
author = "Liang Deng and Peihong Dai and Tanvi Parikh and Hua Cao and Vijay Bhoj and Qinmiao Sun and Zhijian Chen and Taha Merghoub and Alan Houghton and Stewart Shuman",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1128/JVI.01305-08",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "82",
pages = "10735--10746",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "21",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vaccinia virus subverts a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein-dependent innate immune response in keratinocytes through its double-stranded RNA binding protein, E3

AU - Deng, Liang

AU - Dai, Peihong

AU - Parikh, Tanvi

AU - Cao, Hua

AU - Bhoj, Vijay

AU - Sun, Qinmiao

AU - Chen, Zhijian

AU - Merghoub, Taha

AU - Houghton, Alan

AU - Shuman, Stewart

PY - 2008/11

Y1 - 2008/11

N2 - Skin keratinocytes provide a first line of defense against invading microorganisms in two ways: (i) by acting as a physical barrier to pathogen entry and (ii) by initiating a vigorous innate immune response upon sensing danger signals. How keratinocytes detect virus infections and generate antiviral immune responses is not well understood. Orthopoxviruses are dermatotropic DNA viruses that cause lethal disease in humans. Virulence in animal models depends on the virus-encoded bifunctional Z-DNA/double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein E3. Here, we report that infection of mouse primary keratinocytes with a vaccinia ΔE3L mutant virus triggers the production of beta interferon (IFN-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CCL4, and CCL5. None of these immune mediators is produced by keratinocytes infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. The dsRNA-binding domain of E3 suffices to prevent activation of the innate immune response. ΔE3L induction of IFN-β, IL-6, CCL4, and CCL5 secretion requires mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS; an adaptor for the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors RIG-I and MDA5) and the transcription factor IRF3. IRF3 phosphorylation is induced in keratinocytes infected with ΔE3L, an event that depends on MAVS. The response of keratinocytes to ΔE3L is unaffected by genetic ablation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TRIF, TLR9, and MyD88.

AB - Skin keratinocytes provide a first line of defense against invading microorganisms in two ways: (i) by acting as a physical barrier to pathogen entry and (ii) by initiating a vigorous innate immune response upon sensing danger signals. How keratinocytes detect virus infections and generate antiviral immune responses is not well understood. Orthopoxviruses are dermatotropic DNA viruses that cause lethal disease in humans. Virulence in animal models depends on the virus-encoded bifunctional Z-DNA/double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein E3. Here, we report that infection of mouse primary keratinocytes with a vaccinia ΔE3L mutant virus triggers the production of beta interferon (IFN-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CCL4, and CCL5. None of these immune mediators is produced by keratinocytes infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. The dsRNA-binding domain of E3 suffices to prevent activation of the innate immune response. ΔE3L induction of IFN-β, IL-6, CCL4, and CCL5 secretion requires mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS; an adaptor for the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors RIG-I and MDA5) and the transcription factor IRF3. IRF3 phosphorylation is induced in keratinocytes infected with ΔE3L, an event that depends on MAVS. The response of keratinocytes to ΔE3L is unaffected by genetic ablation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TRIF, TLR9, and MyD88.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55249122956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55249122956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/JVI.01305-08

DO - 10.1128/JVI.01305-08

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 10735

EP - 10746

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 21

ER -