Variability in daily self-reported emotional symptoms and fatigue measured over eight weeks in community dwelling individuals with traumatic brain injury

Shannon B Juengst, Lauren Terhorst, Chung Lin Kew, Amy K. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate within-person variability in daily self-reported emotional and fatigue symptoms and factors associated with high within-person variability among individuals with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: This was a prospective descriptive pilot study of n = 18 adults with chronic TBI (2–27 years post-injury) who owned and could independently use an Apple or Android device. Methods: Participants completed daily assessments for 8 weeks via smartphone. Outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Patient Health Questionnaire-2, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2, and a 7-point fatigue rating. We examined within-person variability over time using individual Multilevel Linear Models. We categorized within-person variability as High or Low based on individual standard deviations in relationship to sample standard deviation. Results: Significant temporal within-person variability occurred for all measures. High variability was associated with more symptom reporting versus Low variability, and variability was associated with sex (High variability: 88% women; Low variability 90% men). Conclusions: Symptom measurement at a single time point among adults with chronic TBI may not capture day-to-day symptom fluctuation and may misidentify individuals in need of intervention. Assessing symptom profiles over time to capture temporal and individual variability may provide a more ecologically valid measure for managing long-term symptoms after TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBrain Injury
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Independent Living
Chronic Brain Injury
Fatigue
Malus
Anxiety Disorders
Linear Models
Appointments and Schedules
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Traumatic Brain Injury
Equipment and Supplies
Health
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • ecological momentary assessment
  • emotions
  • fatigue
  • smartphone
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Variability in daily self-reported emotional symptoms and fatigue measured over eight weeks in community dwelling individuals with traumatic brain injury. / Juengst, Shannon B; Terhorst, Lauren; Kew, Chung Lin; Wagner, Amy K.

In: Brain Injury, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b1856d00e2ea4ae3adf67995e1d81db0,
title = "Variability in daily self-reported emotional symptoms and fatigue measured over eight weeks in community dwelling individuals with traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate within-person variability in daily self-reported emotional and fatigue symptoms and factors associated with high within-person variability among individuals with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: This was a prospective descriptive pilot study of n = 18 adults with chronic TBI (2–27 years post-injury) who owned and could independently use an Apple or Android device. Methods: Participants completed daily assessments for 8 weeks via smartphone. Outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Patient Health Questionnaire-2, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2, and a 7-point fatigue rating. We examined within-person variability over time using individual Multilevel Linear Models. We categorized within-person variability as High or Low based on individual standard deviations in relationship to sample standard deviation. Results: Significant temporal within-person variability occurred for all measures. High variability was associated with more symptom reporting versus Low variability, and variability was associated with sex (High variability: 88{\%} women; Low variability 90{\%} men). Conclusions: Symptom measurement at a single time point among adults with chronic TBI may not capture day-to-day symptom fluctuation and may misidentify individuals in need of intervention. Assessing symptom profiles over time to capture temporal and individual variability may provide a more ecologically valid measure for managing long-term symptoms after TBI.",
keywords = "ecological momentary assessment, emotions, fatigue, smartphone, Traumatic brain injury",
author = "Juengst, {Shannon B} and Lauren Terhorst and Kew, {Chung Lin} and Wagner, {Amy K.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02699052.2019.1584333",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Variability in daily self-reported emotional symptoms and fatigue measured over eight weeks in community dwelling individuals with traumatic brain injury

AU - Juengst, Shannon B

AU - Terhorst, Lauren

AU - Kew, Chung Lin

AU - Wagner, Amy K.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: To investigate within-person variability in daily self-reported emotional and fatigue symptoms and factors associated with high within-person variability among individuals with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: This was a prospective descriptive pilot study of n = 18 adults with chronic TBI (2–27 years post-injury) who owned and could independently use an Apple or Android device. Methods: Participants completed daily assessments for 8 weeks via smartphone. Outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Patient Health Questionnaire-2, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2, and a 7-point fatigue rating. We examined within-person variability over time using individual Multilevel Linear Models. We categorized within-person variability as High or Low based on individual standard deviations in relationship to sample standard deviation. Results: Significant temporal within-person variability occurred for all measures. High variability was associated with more symptom reporting versus Low variability, and variability was associated with sex (High variability: 88% women; Low variability 90% men). Conclusions: Symptom measurement at a single time point among adults with chronic TBI may not capture day-to-day symptom fluctuation and may misidentify individuals in need of intervention. Assessing symptom profiles over time to capture temporal and individual variability may provide a more ecologically valid measure for managing long-term symptoms after TBI.

AB - Objective: To investigate within-person variability in daily self-reported emotional and fatigue symptoms and factors associated with high within-person variability among individuals with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: This was a prospective descriptive pilot study of n = 18 adults with chronic TBI (2–27 years post-injury) who owned and could independently use an Apple or Android device. Methods: Participants completed daily assessments for 8 weeks via smartphone. Outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Patient Health Questionnaire-2, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2, and a 7-point fatigue rating. We examined within-person variability over time using individual Multilevel Linear Models. We categorized within-person variability as High or Low based on individual standard deviations in relationship to sample standard deviation. Results: Significant temporal within-person variability occurred for all measures. High variability was associated with more symptom reporting versus Low variability, and variability was associated with sex (High variability: 88% women; Low variability 90% men). Conclusions: Symptom measurement at a single time point among adults with chronic TBI may not capture day-to-day symptom fluctuation and may misidentify individuals in need of intervention. Assessing symptom profiles over time to capture temporal and individual variability may provide a more ecologically valid measure for managing long-term symptoms after TBI.

KW - ecological momentary assessment

KW - emotions

KW - fatigue

KW - smartphone

KW - Traumatic brain injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062541297&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062541297&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02699052.2019.1584333

DO - 10.1080/02699052.2019.1584333

M3 - Article

C2 - 30836017

AN - SCOPUS:85062541297

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

ER -