Venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia: Hemodynamics, blood flow, and thermal gradients

Roger A. Vertrees, Akhil Bidani, Donald J. Deyo, Weike Tao, Joseph B. Zwischenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Thermal events during extracorporeal venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (VV-PISH) were studied and related to determination of whole-body and regional thermal isoeffect doses. Methods. Swine (n = 6, 77 ± 4.5 kg) were heated to a target temperature of 43°C for 120 minutes using VV-PISH. Colored microspheres were injected during pre-heat, heat induction, maintenance, cool down, and after decannulation. The esophageal, tympanic, rectal, pulmonary artery, bladder, bone marrow, kidney, brain, blood, lung, and airway temperatures were recorded continuously. The thermal dose, thermal exchange, metabolic heat production, heat loss to the environment, the change in body heat, and the thermal isoeffect dose were studied at 15-minute intervals. Results. VV-PISH increased heart rate and cardiac output and caused a redistribution of blood flow favoring the thoracoabdominal organs. Greatest thermal exchange occurred during the heating phase (total 2,162 ± 143 kJ), metabolic heat production contributed in all phases (274 ± 9 kJ), the greatest change in body heat occurred during heating (1,310 ± 309 kJ) with a total delivered thermal dose of 298 ± 21 kJ, and the total whole body thermal isoeffect dose at 100 ± 5 minutes. Conclusions. VV-PISH is feasible, is capable of transferring sufficient heat, causes a redistribution of blood flow favoring the thoracoabdominal organs, and facilitates calculation of whole-body and regional thermal isoeffect doses. (C) 2000 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-652
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Induced Hyperthermia
Perfusion
Hot Temperature
Hemodynamics
Thermogenesis
Heating
Temperature
Microspheres
Cardiac Output
Pulmonary Artery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia : Hemodynamics, blood flow, and thermal gradients. / Vertrees, Roger A.; Bidani, Akhil; Deyo, Donald J.; Tao, Weike; Zwischenberger, Joseph B.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 70, No. 2, 2000, p. 644-652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vertrees, Roger A. ; Bidani, Akhil ; Deyo, Donald J. ; Tao, Weike ; Zwischenberger, Joseph B. / Venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia : Hemodynamics, blood flow, and thermal gradients. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 70, No. 2. pp. 644-652.
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AB - Background. Thermal events during extracorporeal venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (VV-PISH) were studied and related to determination of whole-body and regional thermal isoeffect doses. Methods. Swine (n = 6, 77 ± 4.5 kg) were heated to a target temperature of 43°C for 120 minutes using VV-PISH. Colored microspheres were injected during pre-heat, heat induction, maintenance, cool down, and after decannulation. The esophageal, tympanic, rectal, pulmonary artery, bladder, bone marrow, kidney, brain, blood, lung, and airway temperatures were recorded continuously. The thermal dose, thermal exchange, metabolic heat production, heat loss to the environment, the change in body heat, and the thermal isoeffect dose were studied at 15-minute intervals. Results. VV-PISH increased heart rate and cardiac output and caused a redistribution of blood flow favoring the thoracoabdominal organs. Greatest thermal exchange occurred during the heating phase (total 2,162 ± 143 kJ), metabolic heat production contributed in all phases (274 ± 9 kJ), the greatest change in body heat occurred during heating (1,310 ± 309 kJ) with a total delivered thermal dose of 298 ± 21 kJ, and the total whole body thermal isoeffect dose at 100 ± 5 minutes. Conclusions. VV-PISH is feasible, is capable of transferring sufficient heat, causes a redistribution of blood flow favoring the thoracoabdominal organs, and facilitates calculation of whole-body and regional thermal isoeffect doses. (C) 2000 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

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