Ventriculitis complicating use of intraventricular catheters in adult neurosurgical patients

K. E. Lyke, O. O. Obasanjo, M. A. Williams, M. O’Brien, R. Chotani, T. M. Perl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

158 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ventriculitis is a serious complication of intraventricular catheter (IVC) use, with rates of IVC-related infections ranging from 0% to 45% and gram-positive organisms predominating. We prospectively analyzed ventriculostomy-related infections occurring among 157 adult neurosurgical patients (mean age, 54.9 years; 90 [57%] were women) from 1995 through 1998, to determine the incidence of, risk factors for, and organisms that cause ventriculitis. A total of 196 IVC events resulted in 11 infections (5.6%; 9 were caused by gram-negative organisms and 2 by coagulase-negative staphylococci). Independent risk factors for IVC-related infection include length of IVC placement (8.5 days [infected] vs. 5.1 days [uninfected]; P = .007) and cerebrospinal fluid leakage about the IVC (P = .003). The length of hospital stay (30.8 days vs. 22.6 days; P = .03) and mean total hospital charges ($85,674.27 vs. $55,339.21; P = .009) were greater for infected patients than for uninfected patients. In addition, a microbiologic shift from gram-positive organisms toward gram-negative organisms was noted. This study suggests that IVC-related infections remain serious infections that increase the length of hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2028-2033
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2001

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Catheter-Related Infections
Catheters
Length of Stay
Infection
Ventriculostomy
Hospital Charges
Coagulase
Staphylococcus
Hospitalization
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ventriculitis complicating use of intraventricular catheters in adult neurosurgical patients. / Lyke, K. E.; Obasanjo, O. O.; Williams, M. A.; O’Brien, M.; Chotani, R.; Perl, T. M.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 33, No. 12, 15.12.2001, p. 2028-2033.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyke, K. E. ; Obasanjo, O. O. ; Williams, M. A. ; O’Brien, M. ; Chotani, R. ; Perl, T. M. / Ventriculitis complicating use of intraventricular catheters in adult neurosurgical patients. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 12. pp. 2028-2033.
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