Very large G protein-coupled receptor-1, the largest known cell surface protein, is highly expressed in the developing central nervous system

D. Randy McMillan, Kathleen M. Kayes-Wandover, James A. Richardson, Perrin C. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Scopus citations

Abstract

We previously identified a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, very large G protein-coupled receptor-1 (VLGR1). VLGR1 has a large ectodomain containing multiple calcium exchanger β repeats that resemble regulatory domains of sodium-calcium exchanger proteins. Similar repeats are found in the extracellular aggregation factor of marine sponges, which mediates species-specific cell aggregation. We now report that the protein encoded by the originally described human cDNA (now termed VLGR1a) is, in fact, at 1967 amino acids, the smallest of three expressed human isoforms. It is encoded by an alternative transcript that begins within intron 64 of the VLGR1 gene. The longest gene product, VLGR1b, is 6307 amino acids (6298 amino acids in mice) due to a much larger ectodomain containing 35 calcium exchanger β repeats and a pentraxin homology domain. VLGR1b is apparently the largest known cell surface protein. The VLGR1 gene comprises 90 exons and is > 600 kb long. In situ hybridization studies with mouse embryo sections show that high level expression of VLGR1 is restricted to the developing central nervous system and eye. Strong expression in the ventricular zone, home of neural progenitor cells during embryonal neurogenesis, suggests a fundamental role for VLGR1 in the development of the central nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-792
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume277
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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