Vitamin D deficiency in obese children and its relationship to glucose homeostasis

Micah L. Olson, Naim M. Maalouf, Jon D. Oden, Perrin C. White, Michele R. Hutchison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in obese and non-overweight children in North Texas, to examine relationships between dietary habits and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level in obese children, and to examine the relationship between 25(OH)D level and markers of abnormal glucose metabolism and blood pressure. Patients and Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, dietary information, serum 25(OH)D, fasting glucose and insulin, 2-h glucose from oral glucose tolerance test, hemoglobin A1c, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were recorded for 411 obese subjects (6-16 yr old) at an obesity referral clinic. 25(OH)D was also obtained from 87 control non-overweight subjects (6-16 yr old). Results: Ninety-two percent of obese subjects had a 25(OH)D level below 75 nmol/liter, and 50% were below 50 nmol/liter. Among non-overweight subjects, these frequencies were 68 and 22%, respectively (both P < 0.01 compared with obese subjects). 25(OH)D was negatively associated with soda intake (P <0.001), juice intake (P = 0.009), and skipping breakfast (P < 0.001). 25(OH)D was negatively correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = -0.19; P = 0.001) and 2-h glucose (r = -0.12; P = 0.04) after adjustment for body mass index and age but was not correlated with hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure Z score, or diastolic blood pressure Z score. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in children in this southern United States location and is significantly more prevalent in obese children. Lower 25(OH)D level is associated with risk factors for type 2 diabetes in obese children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-285
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D
Blood pressure
Homeostasis
Blood Pressure
Glucose
Insulin
Hemoglobins
Insulin Resistance
Medical problems
Metabolism
Breakfast
Feeding Behavior
Glucose Tolerance Test
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Fasting
Body Mass Index
Referral and Consultation
Obesity
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Vitamin D deficiency in obese children and its relationship to glucose homeostasis. / Olson, Micah L.; Maalouf, Naim M.; Oden, Jon D.; White, Perrin C.; Hutchison, Michele R.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 279-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in obese and non-overweight children in North Texas, to examine relationships between dietary habits and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level in obese children, and to examine the relationship between 25(OH)D level and markers of abnormal glucose metabolism and blood pressure. Patients and Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, dietary information, serum 25(OH)D, fasting glucose and insulin, 2-h glucose from oral glucose tolerance test, hemoglobin A1c, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were recorded for 411 obese subjects (6-16 yr old) at an obesity referral clinic. 25(OH)D was also obtained from 87 control non-overweight subjects (6-16 yr old). Results: Ninety-two percent of obese subjects had a 25(OH)D level below 75 nmol/liter, and 50{\%} were below 50 nmol/liter. Among non-overweight subjects, these frequencies were 68 and 22{\%}, respectively (both P < 0.01 compared with obese subjects). 25(OH)D was negatively associated with soda intake (P <0.001), juice intake (P = 0.009), and skipping breakfast (P < 0.001). 25(OH)D was negatively correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = -0.19; P = 0.001) and 2-h glucose (r = -0.12; P = 0.04) after adjustment for body mass index and age but was not correlated with hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure Z score, or diastolic blood pressure Z score. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in children in this southern United States location and is significantly more prevalent in obese children. Lower 25(OH)D level is associated with risk factors for type 2 diabetes in obese children.",
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