Voices of leadership: wisdom from women leaders in neuropsychology

Cheryl H. Silver, Andreana Benitez, Kira Armstrong, Chriscelyn M. Tussey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Inspired by panel discussions at various neuropsychology conferences, the aim of this paper is to share wisdom that women in neuropsychology acquired from their leadership experiences. Method: We identified 46 women leaders in governance and academic research through reviews of organizational websites and journal editorial boards, and requested their response to brief questions via email. Twenty-one leaders provided responses to three questions formulated by the authors. Results: This paper summarizes the primary themes for the following questions: (1) What advice would you give to a woman neuropsychologist who is seeking to move into a leadership role? Responses included: increase visibility, make connections, know yourself, be confident, and gather information. (2) What leadership style(s) works best? No respondents endorsed a ‘best’ leadership style; however, they suggested that leaders should know their own personal style, be open and transparent, find a shared mission, and most importantly–use a collaborative approach. (3) What helps a woman earn respect as a leader in neuropsychology? Respondents recommended that leaders should: get involved in the work, demonstrate integrity, do your homework, be dependable, and keep meetings focused. Conclusions: It is the authors’ intent that by gathering and distilling advice from successful women leaders in neuropsychology, more women may be catalyzed to pursue leadership roles in our profession.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-262
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2018

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Neuropsychology
Wisdom
Research

Keywords

  • advice
  • Gender
  • leadership
  • recommendations
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Voices of leadership : wisdom from women leaders in neuropsychology. / Silver, Cheryl H.; Benitez, Andreana; Armstrong, Kira; Tussey, Chriscelyn M.

In: Clinical Neuropsychologist, Vol. 32, No. 2, 17.02.2018, p. 252-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silver, Cheryl H. ; Benitez, Andreana ; Armstrong, Kira ; Tussey, Chriscelyn M. / Voices of leadership : wisdom from women leaders in neuropsychology. In: Clinical Neuropsychologist. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 252-262.
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