WE‐E‐BRB‐05: A Novel Detector Dose Calculation Model for in Vivo Delivery Verification of IMRT Treatments

W. lu, M. Chen, G. Olivera, D. Galmarini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Exit 2D detectors are widely used in clinics as a tool for pre‐ treatment field verification. It is desired to have accurate modeling of the detector dose for each IMRT plan with patient geometry for in‐vivo delivery verification. We propose a novel hybrid of model and measurement based methods to estimate the detector dose using the information from TPS and plan/verification CT. Methods: Our approach is based on the generalized equivalent field size (GEFS) method. It requires two commissioning tables for various square fields (l×l, 2×2, …40×40): the percent depth dose (PDD) table and the detector correction factor (DDCF) table. PDDs are retrieved from the treatment planning system (TPS), and DDCFs are reconstructed from measurement with various field sizes and air gaps (from 5 cm to 50 cm). GEFS models the detector point dose as the superposition of annular contribution of the fluence map, which is retrieved from the TPS. Correction on the radiological path length is calculated through ray‐tracing the patient CT. Corrections on the air gap between the couch and detector and detector response are applied via table lookup on PDD and DDCF. Results: We validated the proposed method using TPS with extended geometry and direct clinic measurements for both regular and IMRT fields, various phantom and patient geometry. For all calculations, more than 98% of pixels pass the gamma index with criteria of 3%, 3mm. Each calculation took only a few seconds on a single PC. Conclusions: We proposed a novel detector dose calculation method that can be applied for arbitrary IMRT field and arbitrary patient geometry. The calculation is simple and fast and when compared with detector measurement during IMRT treatment, makes in‐ vivo delivery verification and dose reconstruction feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalMedical Physics
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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WE‐E‐BRB‐05 : A Novel Detector Dose Calculation Model for in Vivo Delivery Verification of IMRT Treatments. / lu, W.; Chen, M.; Olivera, G.; Galmarini, D.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 39, No. 6, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: Exit 2D detectors are widely used in clinics as a tool for pre‐ treatment field verification. It is desired to have accurate modeling of the detector dose for each IMRT plan with patient geometry for in‐vivo delivery verification. We propose a novel hybrid of model and measurement based methods to estimate the detector dose using the information from TPS and plan/verification CT. Methods: Our approach is based on the generalized equivalent field size (GEFS) method. It requires two commissioning tables for various square fields (l×l, 2×2, …40×40): the percent depth dose (PDD) table and the detector correction factor (DDCF) table. PDDs are retrieved from the treatment planning system (TPS), and DDCFs are reconstructed from measurement with various field sizes and air gaps (from 5 cm to 50 cm). GEFS models the detector point dose as the superposition of annular contribution of the fluence map, which is retrieved from the TPS. Correction on the radiological path length is calculated through ray‐tracing the patient CT. Corrections on the air gap between the couch and detector and detector response are applied via table lookup on PDD and DDCF. Results: We validated the proposed method using TPS with extended geometry and direct clinic measurements for both regular and IMRT fields, various phantom and patient geometry. For all calculations, more than 98{\%} of pixels pass the gamma index with criteria of 3{\%}, 3mm. Each calculation took only a few seconds on a single PC. Conclusions: We proposed a novel detector dose calculation method that can be applied for arbitrary IMRT field and arbitrary patient geometry. The calculation is simple and fast and when compared with detector measurement during IMRT treatment, makes in‐ vivo delivery verification and dose reconstruction feasible.",
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