What mom and dad don't know CAN hurt you: Adolescent disclosure to and secrecy from parents about type 1 diabetes

Peter Osborn, Cynthia A. Berg, Amy E. Hughes, Phung Pham, Deborah J. Wiebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine how adolescent disclosure to and secrecy from parents were related to parental knowledge of diabetes management behaviors, and to adolescent adherence, metabolic control, and depressive symptoms. Methods A total of 183 adolescents with type 1 diabetes reported on disclosure to and secrecy from parents regarding diabetes management, adherence behaviors, depressive symptoms, and perceptions of parental knowledge. Mothers and fathers reported on their own knowledge. Results Adolescent disclosure was associated with all reporters' perceptions of knowledge. Secrecy from both parents moderated the relationship between disclosure and adherence, and secrecy from fathers moderated the relationship between disclosure to fathers and glycosylated hemoglobin level. In all cases, disclosure was associated with better diabetes management only when secrecy was low. Finally, higher secrecy related to greater adolescent depressive symptoms. Conclusions Disclosure to parents appears to be an important component of how parents get their knowledge about adolescents' diabetes management, but may be most beneficial for diabetes management when it occurs together with low secrecy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-150
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Confidentiality
Disclosure
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Parents
Fathers
Depression
Knowledge Management
Adolescent Behavior
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Mothers

Keywords

  • adherence
  • disclosure
  • parental knowledge
  • parental monitoring
  • secrecy
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What mom and dad don't know CAN hurt you : Adolescent disclosure to and secrecy from parents about type 1 diabetes. / Osborn, Peter; Berg, Cynthia A.; Hughes, Amy E.; Pham, Phung; Wiebe, Deborah J.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 141-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Osborn, Peter ; Berg, Cynthia A. ; Hughes, Amy E. ; Pham, Phung ; Wiebe, Deborah J. / What mom and dad don't know CAN hurt you : Adolescent disclosure to and secrecy from parents about type 1 diabetes. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 141-150.
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