Who Should Be Gluten-Free? A Review for the General Practitioner

Michelle Pearlman, Lisa C Casey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, a gluten-free diet was recommended only for those with celiac disease or IgE-mediated wheat allergy. With changes in food allergy labeling in the United States and the publication of several best-selling books, gluten-related disorders have come to the forefront of popular culture. As a result, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of gluten-free diet followers, many for nontraditional reasons. As “going gluten-free” has become mainstream, it is imperative that health care providers acquire the knowledge to identify true gluten-related disorders to effectively counsel their patients and minimize potential complications from following such a restrictive diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedical Clinics of North America
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Glutens
General Practitioners
Gluten-Free Diet
Wheat Hypersensitivity
Food Labeling
Food Hypersensitivity
Celiac Disease
Health Personnel
Immunoglobulin E
Publications
Diet

Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Nonceliac gluten sensitivity
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Wheat allergy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Who Should Be Gluten-Free? A Review for the General Practitioner. / Pearlman, Michelle; Casey, Lisa C.

In: Medical Clinics of North America, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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