Why related bacterial species bloom simultaneously in the gut

Principles underlying the 'like will to like' concept

Sebastian E. Winter, Andreas J. Bäumler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: The large intestine is host to a complex ecological community composed predominantly of obligate anaerobic bacteria belonging to the classes Bacteroidia and Clostridia. This community confers benefits through its metabolic activities and host interactions. However, a microbial imbalance (dysbiosis) characterized by a decreased abundance of Clostridia and a bloom of facultative anaerobic Proteobacteria is commonly observed during inflammation in the large bowel. Here we review recent insights into the principles that favour simultaneous increases in the abundance of closely related species belonging to the Proteobacteria during inflammation, which provides important clues for the rational design of strategies to treat dysbiosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-184
Number of pages6
JournalCellular Microbiology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

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Dysbiosis
Proteobacteria
Clostridium
Inflammation
Biota
Anaerobic Bacteria
Large Intestine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Why related bacterial species bloom simultaneously in the gut : Principles underlying the 'like will to like' concept. / Winter, Sebastian E.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

In: Cellular Microbiology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 179-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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