Will the unitary view survive the short- and long-term?

Michael D. Patterson, Bart Rypma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this commentary, we focus on four points. First, we discuss the assertion that the unitary model explains dissociations that implicate multiple systems. Second, the distinct nature of information utilized in immediate- and delayed-recall supports the distinct memory systems view. Third, the variable nature of capacity limits corroborates this view. Finally, we review event-related fMRI results that suggest support for multiple systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-752
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume26
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 2003

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Short-Term Memory
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Will the unitary view survive the short- and long-term? / Patterson, Michael D.; Rypma, Bart.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 26, No. 6, 12.2003, p. 751-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patterson, Michael D. ; Rypma, Bart. / Will the unitary view survive the short- and long-term?. In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 2003 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 751-752.
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