Ya gotta have friends: Social support and self-efficacy predict success following immersion treatment

Sonia Sampat, Daniel S. Kirschenbaum, Kristen J. Gierut, Julie N. Germann, Ross Krawczyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective This study examined the impact of perceived social support and self-efficacy on predicting success in weight management following immersion treatment of adolescent obesity. Methods 198 overweight and obese adolescents (M% overweight-=-81.4%; M BMI-=-36.0) participated in Wellspring's cognitive-behavioral therapeutic camps for 3-10 weeks during the summer of 2011. The campers and one of their caretakers completed a series of questionnaires at the halfway point during immersion. One year following camp, campers and their parents provided follow-up heights and weights. Results Multiple regression intent to treat analyses indicated that campers who perceived their friends as supportive, reported confidence in their ability to succeed, and believed that their families functioned well achieved relatively more substantial reductions in percent overweight 1 year after immersion. Perceptions of support anticipated from parents failed to predict success. Campers who more fully engaged in the process of change at camp also achieved somewhat greater success in the long run. Conclusions These results suggest that participants in cognitive-behavioral immersion treatment may improve outcomes by nurturing support from their friends, increasing self-efficacy, and having their families consider family therapy if warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2579-2585
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Immersion
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Parents
Weights and Measures
Family Therapy
Aptitude
Pediatric Obesity
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Ya gotta have friends : Social support and self-efficacy predict success following immersion treatment. / Sampat, Sonia; Kirschenbaum, Daniel S.; Gierut, Kristen J.; Germann, Julie N.; Krawczyk, Ross.

In: Obesity, Vol. 22, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 2579-2585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sampat, Sonia ; Kirschenbaum, Daniel S. ; Gierut, Kristen J. ; Germann, Julie N. ; Krawczyk, Ross. / Ya gotta have friends : Social support and self-efficacy predict success following immersion treatment. In: Obesity. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 12. pp. 2579-2585.
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