A neural efficiency hypothesis of age-related changes in human working memory performance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter examines the changes in executive functions with age, drawing on behavioural and brain imaging data. It focuses on response selection as an important executive function and concludes that this function deteriorates with age because of increased noise in the neural signals, making it difficult for older adults to decide between alternative responses. It suggests that a major change in older adults is a reduction in neural efficiency, particularly in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), which contributes to the deterioration in executive function with age. This is a conclusion that is consistent with behavioural data demonstrating the slowing of cognitive processing in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780191693816
ISBN (Print)9780198570394
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2012

Keywords

  • Brain imaging
  • Cognitive processing
  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • Memory performance
  • Neural efficiency
  • Response selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A neural efficiency hypothesis of age-related changes in human working memory performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this