A survivin gene signature predicts aggressive tumor behavior. Salz W, Eisenberg D, Plescia J, Garlick DS, Weiss RM, Wu XR, Sun TT, Altieri DC, Department of Cancer Biology and the Cancer Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Abstract

Gene signatures that predict aggressive tumor behavior at the earliest stages of disease, ideally before overt tissue abnormalities, are urgently needed. To search for such genes, we generated a transgenic model of survivin, an essential regulator of cell division and apoptosis overexpressed in cancer. Transgenic expression of survivin in the urinary bladder did not cause histologic abnormalities of the urothelium. However, microarray analysis revealed that survivin-expressing bladders exhibited profound changes in gene expression profile affecting extracellular matrix and inflammatory genes. Following exposure to a bladder carcinogen, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (OH-BBN), survivin transgenic animals exhibited accelerated tumor progression, preferential incidence of tumors as compared with premalignant lesions, and dramatically abbreviated survival. Conversely, transgenic expression of a survivin Thr34->Ala dominant-negative mutant did not cause changes in gene expression or accelerated tumor progression after OH-BBN treatment. Therefore, survivin expression induces global transcriptional changes in the tissue microenvironment that may promote tumorigenesis. Detection of survivin or its associated gene signature may provide an early biomarker of aggressive tumor behavior before the appearance of tissue abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-564
Number of pages2
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

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