Adult-age donors offer acceptable long-term survival to pediatric heart transplant recipients: An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database

Mark J. Russo, Ryan R Davies, Robert A. Sorabella, Timothy P. Martens, Isaac George, Faisal H. Cheema, Seema Mital, Ralph S. Mosca, Jonathan M. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: A critical shortage of donor organs has caused many centers to use less restrictive donor criteria, including the use of adult-age donors for pediatric recipients. The purpose of this study is (1) to describe the supply of pediatric (0-18 years) heart donors, (2) to explore the relationship between donor age and long-term survival, and (3) to define threshold age ranges associated with decreased long-term survival. Methods: The United Network of Organ Sharing provided deidentified patient-level data. Primary analysis focused on 1887 heart transplant recipients aged 9 to 18 years undergoing transplantation from October 1, 1987, to September 25, 2005. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used in time-to-event analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves and stratum-specific likelihood ratios were generated to compare survival at various donor age thresholds. Results: The number of pediatric donors decreased (P < .001) over the study period, particularly from 1993 (n = 640) through 2004 (n = 432). Among recipients aged 9 to 18 years, univariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant (P < .001) inverse relationship between donor age and survival. Stratum-specific likelihood ratio analysis generated 3 strata for donor age: the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups consisted of donors aged 13 years or younger (n = 611, 32.41%), 14 to 51 years (n = 1258, 66.7%), and 52 years and older (n = 16, 0.85%), respectively. In the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups median survival was 4069 days (11.1 years), 3495 days (9.57 years), and 1197 days (3.28 years), respectively. Conclusions: Although donors aged 13 years or less offer pediatric recipients the best chance for achieving long-term survival, donors aged 14 to 51 years offer good outcomes to pediatric recipients. Consideration should be given to expanded use of well-selected adult-age donors for pediatric recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1208-1212
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume132
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

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Tissue Donors
Databases
Pediatrics
Survival
Transplant Recipients
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
ROC Curve
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Adult-age donors offer acceptable long-term survival to pediatric heart transplant recipients : An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database. / Russo, Mark J.; Davies, Ryan R; Sorabella, Robert A.; Martens, Timothy P.; George, Isaac; Cheema, Faisal H.; Mital, Seema; Mosca, Ralph S.; Chen, Jonathan M.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 132, No. 5, 01.11.2006, p. 1208-1212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russo, Mark J. ; Davies, Ryan R ; Sorabella, Robert A. ; Martens, Timothy P. ; George, Isaac ; Cheema, Faisal H. ; Mital, Seema ; Mosca, Ralph S. ; Chen, Jonathan M. / Adult-age donors offer acceptable long-term survival to pediatric heart transplant recipients : An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2006 ; Vol. 132, No. 5. pp. 1208-1212.
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title = "Adult-age donors offer acceptable long-term survival to pediatric heart transplant recipients: An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database",
abstract = "Objectives: A critical shortage of donor organs has caused many centers to use less restrictive donor criteria, including the use of adult-age donors for pediatric recipients. The purpose of this study is (1) to describe the supply of pediatric (0-18 years) heart donors, (2) to explore the relationship between donor age and long-term survival, and (3) to define threshold age ranges associated with decreased long-term survival. Methods: The United Network of Organ Sharing provided deidentified patient-level data. Primary analysis focused on 1887 heart transplant recipients aged 9 to 18 years undergoing transplantation from October 1, 1987, to September 25, 2005. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used in time-to-event analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves and stratum-specific likelihood ratios were generated to compare survival at various donor age thresholds. Results: The number of pediatric donors decreased (P < .001) over the study period, particularly from 1993 (n = 640) through 2004 (n = 432). Among recipients aged 9 to 18 years, univariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant (P < .001) inverse relationship between donor age and survival. Stratum-specific likelihood ratio analysis generated 3 strata for donor age: the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups consisted of donors aged 13 years or younger (n = 611, 32.41{\%}), 14 to 51 years (n = 1258, 66.7{\%}), and 52 years and older (n = 16, 0.85{\%}), respectively. In the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups median survival was 4069 days (11.1 years), 3495 days (9.57 years), and 1197 days (3.28 years), respectively. Conclusions: Although donors aged 13 years or less offer pediatric recipients the best chance for achieving long-term survival, donors aged 14 to 51 years offer good outcomes to pediatric recipients. Consideration should be given to expanded use of well-selected adult-age donors for pediatric recipients.",
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T1 - Adult-age donors offer acceptable long-term survival to pediatric heart transplant recipients

T2 - An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database

AU - Russo, Mark J.

AU - Davies, Ryan R

AU - Sorabella, Robert A.

AU - Martens, Timothy P.

AU - George, Isaac

AU - Cheema, Faisal H.

AU - Mital, Seema

AU - Mosca, Ralph S.

AU - Chen, Jonathan M.

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N2 - Objectives: A critical shortage of donor organs has caused many centers to use less restrictive donor criteria, including the use of adult-age donors for pediatric recipients. The purpose of this study is (1) to describe the supply of pediatric (0-18 years) heart donors, (2) to explore the relationship between donor age and long-term survival, and (3) to define threshold age ranges associated with decreased long-term survival. Methods: The United Network of Organ Sharing provided deidentified patient-level data. Primary analysis focused on 1887 heart transplant recipients aged 9 to 18 years undergoing transplantation from October 1, 1987, to September 25, 2005. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used in time-to-event analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves and stratum-specific likelihood ratios were generated to compare survival at various donor age thresholds. Results: The number of pediatric donors decreased (P < .001) over the study period, particularly from 1993 (n = 640) through 2004 (n = 432). Among recipients aged 9 to 18 years, univariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant (P < .001) inverse relationship between donor age and survival. Stratum-specific likelihood ratio analysis generated 3 strata for donor age: the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups consisted of donors aged 13 years or younger (n = 611, 32.41%), 14 to 51 years (n = 1258, 66.7%), and 52 years and older (n = 16, 0.85%), respectively. In the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups median survival was 4069 days (11.1 years), 3495 days (9.57 years), and 1197 days (3.28 years), respectively. Conclusions: Although donors aged 13 years or less offer pediatric recipients the best chance for achieving long-term survival, donors aged 14 to 51 years offer good outcomes to pediatric recipients. Consideration should be given to expanded use of well-selected adult-age donors for pediatric recipients.

AB - Objectives: A critical shortage of donor organs has caused many centers to use less restrictive donor criteria, including the use of adult-age donors for pediatric recipients. The purpose of this study is (1) to describe the supply of pediatric (0-18 years) heart donors, (2) to explore the relationship between donor age and long-term survival, and (3) to define threshold age ranges associated with decreased long-term survival. Methods: The United Network of Organ Sharing provided deidentified patient-level data. Primary analysis focused on 1887 heart transplant recipients aged 9 to 18 years undergoing transplantation from October 1, 1987, to September 25, 2005. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests were used in time-to-event analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves and stratum-specific likelihood ratios were generated to compare survival at various donor age thresholds. Results: The number of pediatric donors decreased (P < .001) over the study period, particularly from 1993 (n = 640) through 2004 (n = 432). Among recipients aged 9 to 18 years, univariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant (P < .001) inverse relationship between donor age and survival. Stratum-specific likelihood ratio analysis generated 3 strata for donor age: the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups consisted of donors aged 13 years or younger (n = 611, 32.41%), 14 to 51 years (n = 1258, 66.7%), and 52 years and older (n = 16, 0.85%), respectively. In the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups median survival was 4069 days (11.1 years), 3495 days (9.57 years), and 1197 days (3.28 years), respectively. Conclusions: Although donors aged 13 years or less offer pediatric recipients the best chance for achieving long-term survival, donors aged 14 to 51 years offer good outcomes to pediatric recipients. Consideration should be given to expanded use of well-selected adult-age donors for pediatric recipients.

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