Affective state and community integration after traumatic brain injury

Shannon B. Juengst, Patricia M. Arenth, Ketki D. Raina, Michael McCue, Elizabeth R. Skidmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies investigating the relationship between affective state and community integration have focused primarily on the influence of depression and anxiety. In addition, they have focused on frequency of participation in various activities, failing to address an individual's subjective satisfaction with participation. The purpose of this study was to examine how affective state contributes to frequency of participation and satisfaction with participation after traumatic brain injury among participants with and without a current major depressive episode. Sixty-four community-dwelling participants with a history of complicated mild-to-severe traumatic brain injury participated in this cross-sectional cohort study. High positive affect contributed significantly to frequency of participation (A = 0.401, P = 0.001), and both high positive affect and low negative affect significantly contributed to better satisfaction with participation (F2,61 = 13.63, P < 0.001). Further investigation to assess the direction of these relationships may better inform effective targets for intervention. These findings highlight the importance of assessing affective state after traumatic brain injury and incorporating a subjective measure of participation when considering community integration outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1086-1094
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume93
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Community Integration
Independent Living
Cohort Studies
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Brain injuries
  • Community integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Affective state and community integration after traumatic brain injury. / Juengst, Shannon B.; Arenth, Patricia M.; Raina, Ketki D.; McCue, Michael; Skidmore, Elizabeth R.

In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 93, No. 12, 01.01.2014, p. 1086-1094.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juengst, Shannon B. ; Arenth, Patricia M. ; Raina, Ketki D. ; McCue, Michael ; Skidmore, Elizabeth R. / Affective state and community integration after traumatic brain injury. In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 93, No. 12. pp. 1086-1094.
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