American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum needs assessment

Charity C. Glass, Robert D. Acton, Patrice G. Blair, Andre R. Campbell, Ellen S. Deutsch, Daniel B. Jones, Kathleen R. Liscum, Ajit K. Sachdeva, Daniel J. Scott, Stephen C. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Simulation can enhance learning effectiveness, efficiency, and patient safety and is engaging for learners. Methods A survey was conducted of surgical clerkship directors nationally and medical students at 5 medical schools to rank and stratify simulation-based educational topics. Students applying to surgery were compared with others using Wilcoxon's rank-sum tests. Results Seventy-three of 163 clerkship directors (45%) and 231 of 872 students (26.5%) completed the survey. Of students, 28.6% were applying for surgical residency training. Clerkship directors and students generally agreed on the importance and timing of specific educational topics. Clerkship directors tended to rank basic skills, such as examination skills, higher than medical students. Students ranked procedural skills, such as lumbar puncture, more highly than clerkship directors. Conclusions Surgery clerkship directors and 4th-year medical students agree substantially about the content of a simulation-based curriculum, although 4th-year medical students recommended that some topics be taught earlier than the clerkship directors recommended. Students planning to apply to surgical residencies did not differ significantly in their scoring from students pursuing nonsurgical specialties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-169
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume207
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Needs Assessment
Medical Students
Curriculum
Students
Education
Internship and Residency
Nonparametric Statistics
Spinal Puncture
Patient Safety
Medical Schools
Learning
Efficiency

Keywords

  • Medical education
  • Medical student education
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum needs assessment. / Glass, Charity C.; Acton, Robert D.; Blair, Patrice G.; Campbell, Andre R.; Deutsch, Ellen S.; Jones, Daniel B.; Liscum, Kathleen R.; Sachdeva, Ajit K.; Scott, Daniel J.; Yang, Stephen C.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 207, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 165-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glass, CC, Acton, RD, Blair, PG, Campbell, AR, Deutsch, ES, Jones, DB, Liscum, KR, Sachdeva, AK, Scott, DJ & Yang, SC 2014, 'American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum needs assessment', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 207, no. 2, pp. 165-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.07.032
Glass, Charity C. ; Acton, Robert D. ; Blair, Patrice G. ; Campbell, Andre R. ; Deutsch, Ellen S. ; Jones, Daniel B. ; Liscum, Kathleen R. ; Sachdeva, Ajit K. ; Scott, Daniel J. ; Yang, Stephen C. / American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum needs assessment. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 207, No. 2. pp. 165-169.
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